• 4 minutes England Running Out of Water?
  • 7 minutes Trump to Make Allies Pay More to Host US Bases
  • 10 minutes U.S. Shale Output may Start Dropping Next Year
  • 14 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 19 mins Tidal Power Closer to Commercialisation
  • 9 hours Oil-sands recovery by solvents has started on a trial basis; first loads now shipped.
  • 4 hours US-backed coup in Venezuela not so smooth
  • 2 hours Solar to Become World's Largest Power Source by 2050
  • 9 hours New Rebate For EVs in Canada
  • 3 hours Read: OPEC THREATENED TO KILL US SHALE
  • 17 hours Why U.S. Growers Are Betting The Farm On Soybeans Amid China Trade War
  • 1 hour Will Trump Cave Again
  • 13 hours Biomass, Ethanol No Longer Green
  • 7 hours Boeing Faces Safety Questions After Second 737 Crash In Five Months
  • 8 hours Oil stocks are heating up again! What's on your Watchlist?
  • 12 hours Malaysia Oil & Gas Updates
Global Intelligence Report – 13th March 2019

Global Intelligence Report – 13th March 2019

While the NOPEC legislation has…

Cloud Peak On Brink Of Collapse After Bad Coal Bet

Cloud Peak On Brink Of Collapse After Bad Coal Bet

The U.S. power sector’s pivot…

Burma, China Ignoring Environmental Warnings for Dam

The hugely controversial Myitsone dam in northern Burma, currently under construction by the China Power Investment Corporation, was the subject of a 2009 internal report by the company, which called for the project to be scrapped.
 
The Environmental Impact Assessment report has nevertheless been ignored, and work is proceeding on the project, the Democratic Voice of Burma Online reported.
 
The EIA report stated that, "If the Burmese and Chinese sides were really concerned about environmental issues and aimed at sustainable development of the country, there is no need for such a big dam to be constructed at the confluence of the Irrawaddy River," urging instead for two smaller, but equally efficient, dams to be built above Myitsone.

Upon its completion in 2017, the $4 billion Myitsone dam will become the world's fifteenth biggest hydropower structure.

According to the Burma Rivers Network, which closely monitors the social and environmental impacts of the various energy initiatives on Burma's waterways, around 15,000 people will be displaced around the dam site, while the sizeable changes in the Irrawaddy river's flow will "impact millions of people downstream who depend on the Irrawaddy for agriculture, fishing, and transportation."
 
China has faced strong international criticism for its business links with Burma, whose ruling junta is subject to a number of international sanctions.

By. Joao Peixe, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News