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Wall Street’s Big Coronavirus Mistake

Wall Street’s Big Coronavirus Mistake

The coronavirus has wreaked havoc…

Mad Hedge Fund Trader

Mad Hedge Fund Trader

John Thomas, The Mad Hedge Fund Trader is one of today's most successful Hedge Fund Managers and a 40 year veteran of the financial markets.…

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Confessions of a Bull – Barton Biggs of Traxis Partners Outlines His Investment Strategy

Barton Biggs, founder of mega hedge fund Traxis Partners, spent an hour outlining his current investment strategy with me. Barton is a man of strong opinions, backed with intensive research, which he communicates with his characteristic gravel voice. I spent the better part of the eighties debating every pebble of the investment landscape with Barton. As I recall, "what to do about Japan?" was the topic of the day, and I was bullish.

Today, Barton can say with "real certainty" that large cap multinational equities are the cheapest they have been in 30 years using sophisticated models that analyze price/sales, price/free cash flow, price/earnings, and a whole host of other metrics. Looking just at price/book ratios, these stocks have been this cheap only three times in the last 120 years.

Big cap technology stocks, like Microsoft (MSFT), Intel (INTC), Cisco (CSCO), and Oracle (ORCL) are at the top of his list. Other multinationals with plenty of emerging market exposure are attractive, such as Caterpillar (CAT). The easy way in here is to simply buy the S&P 100 ETF (OEF). The market is now at a 12-13 multiple, discounting S&P 500 earnings for 2010 at $75/share. A stronger than expected economy will take that figure as high as $90/share, which the market is not expecting at all.

The grizzled old Wall Street Veteran sees the US as half way through an economic recovery, and the main benchmark indexes could surprise to the upside, as they have such heavy big cap weightings. He would avoid domestic companies, such as those in real estate, as the environment for stocks generally is poor. He foresees a "new normal" of a lot of volatility in stocks for the next 4-5 years. Longer term he sees US GDP growth downshifting from the heady 3.8% annual growth rate of the last decade to only 2.5 % in this one. But big cap multinationals should be able to bring in a reliable 5%-6% annual return on top of inflation.

Looking at the world as a whole, Barton thinks Asia is the place to be. A mammoth bubble may be developing in China (FXI), but it is at least 3-5 years off, and there will be plenty of money to be made until then. India (PIN) is another big pick because it is ten years behind China, and has yet to experience its big growth spurt. South Korea (EWY), Thailand (THD), Taiwan (EWT), H-shares in Hong Kong (EWH), and Turkey (TUR) are also lining up in Barton's sites. Looking at a 1%-1.5% growth rate, things look grim for Europe, with the possible exceptions of Poland (PLND) and Russia (RSX). Traxis is short Brazil (EWZ), because it has already had a great run, and because the country still faces some severe social problems.

Commodities had their run last year, and won't do much from here, but they aren't going to crash either. He sees oil (USO) grinding up because the cost of new sources is becoming astronomically high. Barton avoids gold because it has no yield or PE, and would rather not be associated with the crazies that inhabit that space. Bonds (TBF) will be deflation driven for the next year, but are definitely not for your "Rip Van Winkle" investor, as they represent poor value for money. Real estate is dead money.

By. Mad Hedge Fund Trader


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