• 2 hours British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 6 hours Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 8 hours Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 9 hours Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 10 hours OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 11 hours London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 12 hours Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 15 hours Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 21 hours India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 1 day Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 1 day Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 2 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 2 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 2 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 2 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 2 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 2 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 2 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 2 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 3 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 3 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 3 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 3 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 3 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 3 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 3 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 4 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 4 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 6 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 6 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 6 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 7 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 7 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 7 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 7 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 7 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 7 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 7 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 7 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
Alt Text

The U.S. Shale Play To Watch In 2018

The original U.S. shale gas…

Alt Text

Oil Fundamentals Overturn Geopolitical Risk

Geopolitical risk from Iraq and…

LEGO Bows To Greenpeace Campaign, Breaks Ties With Shell

LEGO Bows To Greenpeace Campaign, Breaks Ties With Shell

LEGO, whose toy building blocks are known for charming children’s constructions, will end its five-decade marketing ties with Royal Dutch Shell under pressure from Greenpeace, which says the oil company is guilty of vast pollution and has been exploiting LEGO to improve its image.

Greenpeace began a campaign in July to bring public pressure on the Danish toy manufacturer to end its contract with Shell, the Anglo-Dutch energy giant, and so far has gathered slightly more than 1 million signatures – short of its goal of 1.25 million – on a petition to pressure LEGO.

Much of the focus of the Greenpeace campaign was Shell’s planned work in the Arctic. In January, it canceled plans to drill there for oil this year, but in August, it submitted to U.S. authorities a new plan for offshore oil exploration in the Arctic Ocean off the northwest coast of Alaska in 2015.

Related: The 10 Worst Energy-Related Disasters Of Modern Times

Since 1966, LEGO has produced sets of its construction toys that include blocks and other items featuring Shell’s logo and other petroleum-related items. As recently as 2014, it manufactured kits featuring miniature Grand Prix articles, including racecars and a finish line.

Greenpeace says Shell’s public relations agency acknowledges that the partnership provides $638 million worth of public goodwill value to Shell by blurring the fact that the oil company is guilty of “dirty oil drilling,” including the Arctic. The partnership also increases the oil company’s sales by 7.5 percent, Greenpeace says, and customer loyalty by fully 52 percent.

The Amsterdam-based environmental group didn’t explain how those figures were reached.

When the Greenpeace campaign began, LEGO complained that the focus of its pressure shouldn’t be on the toy company but on Shell itself. Finally, though, on Oct. 10, LEGO CEO Jørgen Vig Knudstorp said that “as things currently stand, we will not renew the contract with Shell when the present contract ends.” The contract began in 2011, but its expiration date and value were not disclosed.

Related: When Needs Must: EC Greenlights Canadian Oil Sands Imports

Greenpeace’s campaign included some vivid videos, including one viewed more than 6 million times on YouTube that shows an exquisite Arctic scene built from 120 pounds of LEGOs being drowned in oil. The video is called, “LEGO: Everything is NOT awesome,” a play on the title of a song promoting “The LEGO Movie,” which came out earlier this year.

Greenpeace UK Executive Director John Sauven said the campaign “did touch a bit of a raw nerve about the partnership between the two companies that people thought was completely inappropriate.” He said he hoped LEGO’s decision would inspire other Shell partners to reconsider those ties.

A Shell spokesman who withheld his name called the relationship with LEGO successful and productive, but added, “We respect the right of individuals and organizations to engage in a free and frank exchange of views about meeting the world’s growing energy needs.”

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Back to homepage


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News