• 15 hours PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 17 hours Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 19 hours Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 20 hours Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 21 hours Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 22 hours Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 23 hours Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 1 day New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 1 day Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 1 day Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 1 day Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 2 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 2 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 2 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 2 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 2 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 2 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 2 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 2 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 3 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 3 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 3 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 3 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 4 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 4 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 4 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 4 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 4 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 4 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 4 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 4 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 5 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 5 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 5 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 5 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 5 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
Alt Text

This Key Data Points At Strong U.S. Oil Demand

U.S. Gasoline prices haven’t risen…

Alt Text

Why U.S. Crude Exports Are Booming

U.S. crude oil exports are…

Alt Text

Aggressive OPEC Pushes Oil Prices Up

Oil prices are once again…

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel Graeber is a writer and political analyst based in Michigan. His work on matters related to the geopolitical aspects of the global energy sector,…

More Info

As EPA Launches War On Emissions, U.S. Plays Catch Up With Europe On Renewables

As EPA Launches War On Emissions, U.S. Plays Catch Up With Europe On Renewables

The United States is behind the curve when it comes to the percentage of renewable energy resources on its national grid. And with domestic oil and natural gas production increasing, low-carbon solutions may fall even further by the wayside.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) says enough energy was produced from domestic resources last year to meet 84 percent of total U.S. energy demand.

Natural gas, it said, was the largest domestic energy resource for the third year running, followed by other fossil fuels like coal and crude oil. All told, fossil fuels accounted for 82 percent of the energy consumed in the United States last year.

Meanwhile, renewable energy met 10 percent of U.S. energy needs, followed by nuclear power, which accounted for 8 percent.

In December, 2013, U.S. President Barack Obama called on the federal government to "lead by example" by using renewable energy resources to supply 20 percent of its needs by 2020, to the extent that it's "extent economically feasible and technically practicable."

But not every state or municipal government across the country toes the federal line. Only about half of U.S. states have renewable energy mandates.

By comparison, the European Commission said in its first-ever renewable energy progress report in March that most member states are already more than halfway to meeting their 2020 goal of getting 20 percent of their energy needs from renewable energy resources. European emissions, in part as a result, have started to decline.

When the International Energy Agency (IEA) looked at the issue, it found the global energy supply isn't getting any cleaner, despite calls for more action from leading economic powers.

IEA -- an independent, Paris-based group that works with 29 member governments to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy -- said coal still dominates the global energy sector.

Related Article: Not Enough Wind To Fill U.S. Renewable Energy Sails

On an absolute basis, IEA said coal power grew faster than its renewable and nuclear counterparts between 2010 and 2012 and half of the new coal plants built in 2011 used outdated technology.

"This is a major reason why the amount of CO2 emitted for each unit of energy supplied has fallen by less than 1 percent since 1990," IEA said.

On June 2, at the unveiling of the White House’s “Clean Power Plan,” the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it wants to cut those emissions.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a pro-business lobbying group, said the EPA regulations would come with "immense" costs and put up roadblocks to "America's job creators."

And maybe that's part of the issue. Though climate concerns are increasing, the road to a low-carbon economy isn't getting any easier, at least as far as the short-term horizon is concerned.

IEA says things are hardly any better when they were four years ago and, although Obama’s stated energy policy calls for "all-of-the-above" solutions, the EPA's Gina McCarthy also says there's "no one-size-fits-all solution."

By Daniel J. Graeber of Oilprice.com




Back to homepage


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News