• 2 days PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 2 days Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 2 days Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 2 days Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 2 days Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 2 days Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 2 days Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 2 days New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 2 days Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 2 days Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 3 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 3 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 3 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 3 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 3 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 3 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 3 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 3 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 4 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 4 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 4 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 4 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 4 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 4 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 5 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 5 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 5 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 5 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 5 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 5 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 5 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 5 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 5 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 6 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 6 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 6 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 6 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 6 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 6 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
Alt Text

Footloose Iraq Cannibalizes Saudi Market Share

OPEC’s de-facto leader Saudi Arabia…

Alt Text

Oil Fundamentals Overturn Geopolitical Risk

Geopolitical risk from Iraq and…

Alt Text

This Key Data Points At Strong U.S. Oil Demand

U.S. Gasoline prices haven’t risen…

Sohbet Karbuz

Sohbet Karbuz

Born in 1965, I am an engineer and an economist by education (BSc, MSc, PhD, PostDoc), a number cruncher by experience, an energy analyst by…

More Info

A Look at the DOD’s Energy Usage in 2010

A Look at the DOD’s Energy Usage in 2010

The DoD spent $15.2 billion on energy in (Fiscal Year) 2010. Seventy four percent of this (or $11.2 billion) can be attributed to operations while the remaining 24% (or $3.7 billion) to the Department’s permanent installations and 2% (or $0.3 billion) to non-tactical vehicles.

US Military Energy Costs

When we look at the total energy consumption we have a similar picture. In 2010, DoD consumed 872 trillion Btu of site delivered, purchased energy. Seventy three percent of this was operational energy and the rest was facilities energy.

Note that 872 trillion Btu corresponds to site delivered energy. In energy balance terminology it refers to final energy consumption. So, if you want to compare this amount with a country’s energy consumption you better use the estimated source energy, which by the way more or less corresponds to primary energy supply, and which by way is not given in the DoD’s annual energy management report.

U.S. Military energy consumption

According to my calculations the DoD’s primary energy consumption is slightly above 1100 trillion Btu. This is roughly the amount of energy consumed in Nigeria, a country with a population of 150 million.

Two types of energy are dominant in DoD’s energy mix - oil, with a share of 77%, and electricity, with a share of 12%.

In 2010, DoD spent almost $12 billion for the 374,000 barrels of oil it consumed on average each day.  In comparison, Nigeria consumed almost 280,000 barrels per day and Greece 371,000 barrels per day in 2010.

In 2010, DoD consumed 30 billion kWh of electricity. This is equivalent to the electricity consumption Algeria, a country with a population of 35 million. Nigeria consumed almost 20 billion kWh.

This should be not surprising because:

(1) The DOD’s worldwide infrastructure includes over 539,000 facilities (300,638 buildings and the rest structures) located at more than 5,000 sites around the world, on more than 113,000 km2 (bigger than the land area of Louisiana).

(2) The DOD operates approximately 15,800 aircraft, over 300 non-nuclear ships, some 195,000 non-tactical fleet vehicles, over 300,000 tactical ground vehicles (wheeled and tracked), in addition to over 120,000 generators. And all these machines consume oil, lots of it.

No wonder, the DoD is the largest single end use energy consumer in the world. 

And yet, the DoD’s energy consumption is underestimated at least due to two reasons:

• First, DoD’s annual energy management reporting system considers only purchased energy. Therefore, if DoD doesn’t pay anything (in kind fuel and power) then it is not counted.

• Second, the DoD does not take into account of nuclear energy in its energy accounting. So, nuclear energy consumed in 11 nuclear aircraft carriers and over 70 nuclear submarines are unaccounted for.

This is my message for William Lynn (Deputy Secretary of Defense) and Sharon Burke (Assistant Secretary of Defense for Operational Energy Plans and Programs).

Without having a comprehensive data there is no way to do any meaningful energy analysis. Mrs Burke rightly mentioned on several occasions that the DOD lacks sufficient data on and analysis of operational energy use to manage consumption effectively. The DOD needs better statistics on how much energy is being consumed, where, and for what purposes.

By. Sohbet karbuz

You can see more of Sohbet’s work at his blog below.




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Anonymous on October 11 2011 said:
    Not quite a valid comparison- Nigeria. It's a sub-tropical climate, they don't use a whole lot of energy there to heat, their people are destitute-poor, so energy consumption is absurdly low per-capita, and they're hardly even a third world country. Maybe you should have picked an industrial country in the first world with a temperate climate?Seems like your data is cherry-picked to show a disparity that doesn't exist, which may show an astute reader that your bias may invalidate some of your other propositions.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News