• 5 minutes 'No - Deal Brexit' vs 'Operation Fear' Globalist Pushback ... Impact to World Economies and Oil
  • 8 minutes China has *Already* Lost the Trade War. Meantime, the U.S. Might Sanction China’s Largest Oil Company
  • 12 minutes Will Uncle Sam Step Up and Cut Production
  • 10 mins China has invested btw $30 - $40 Billon in Canadian Oil Sands. Trump should put 10% tariffs on all Chinese oil exported into or thru U.S. in which Chinese companies have invested .
  • 16 hours Iran Is Winning Big In The Middle East
  • 3 hours Tit For Tat: China Strikes Back In Trade Dispute With U.S. With New Tariffs
  • 4 hours Trump vs. Xi Trade Battle, Running Commentary from Conservative Tree House
  • 2 hours It's Not the Job of the Government to Dictate Where Businesses Should Go
  • 18 hours Not The Onion: Vivienne Westwood Says Greta Thunberg Should Run the World
  • 14 hours Strong, the Strongest: Audi To Join Mercedes, BMW Development Alliance
  • 1 day Trump cancels Denmark visit amid spat over sale of Greenland
  • 17 hours IS ANOTHER MIDDLE EAST WAR REQUIRED TO BOLSTER THE OIL PRICE
  • 15 hours Wonders of US Shale: US Shale Benefits: The U.S. leads global petroleum and natural gas production with record growth in 2018
  • 1 day OPEC will consider all options. What options do they have ?
  • 10 hours Recession Jitters Are Rising. Is There Reason To Worry?
  • 23 mins US to Drown the World in Oil
Alt Text

Hedge Funds Turn Their Back On Oil

Oil markets took a turn…

Alt Text

Crude Oil Markets Brace For Fuel Market Disruption

The new IMO2020 shipping fuel…

Nick Cunningham

Nick Cunningham

Nick Cunningham is a freelance writer on oil and gas, renewable energy, climate change, energy policy and geopolitics. He is based in Pittsburgh, PA.

More Info

Premium Content

Mixed Earnings Reports Suggest Big Oil May Have Peaked

First-quarter earnings reports are in and the world’s biggest oil companies are reporting mixed results.

ExxonMobil, the largest producer of natural gas in the U.S., reported quarterly earnings of $9.10 billion, down 4.2 percent from $9.50 billion in the same quarter a year ago. Yet it beat Wall Street expectations, owing to a spike in natural gas prices during the winter and a boost in its quarterly dividend. The brutal winter in the eastern U.S. drove natural gas prices up, giving the company more revenue than expected.

Royal Dutch Shell also beat expectations, allowing its stock price to jump 3 percent after reporting. But in a sign of just how low expectations have fallen, Iain Pyle, an analyst with Bernstein Research, said Shell’s latest quarter “was kind of a quarter where everything went right,” but still saw its profit decline by 44 percent in the first quarter compared to a year earlier, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Chevron is due to publish its earnings on May 2, and investors have welcomed its announcement that it is boosting its quarterly dividend by 7 percent. However, the company issued an interim report in April and warned that things weren’t going so well. Chevron also had a very bad 2013; its net income for the fourth quarter dropped by 32 percent.

BP saw its quarterly earnings drop to $3.2 billion, a 24 percent drop from a year ago, but a 14 percent jump from last quarter. Its stock price climbed by 2.5 percent as BP also announced an increase in the quarterly dividend.

The results come as business activities are being complicated by geopolitical events. The escalating Western sanctions on Russia over its actions in Ukraine have injected uncertainty into the huge investments that BP, Shell and ExxonMobil have in Russia. “I don't think we will be jumping into new investments in the short term,” Royal Dutch Shell's chief financial officer, Simon Henry, said in a conference call on April 30.

From an investor’s standpoint, the earnings reports highlight a troubling trend: Several big companies are experiencing stagnating or declining oil production. ExxonMobil’s quarterly production on an oil-equivalent basis dropped 5.6 percent year-on-year. Shell’s was down 4 percent over the same timeframe. BP reported an 8.5 percent decline. ConocoPhillips had a modest decline.

“These companies are spending a lot of money and they aren't seeing the returns,” said Brian Youngberg, an analyst at Edward Jones, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Ultimately, the huge problem is the difficulty in finding new sources of oil. “Like its peers, (Exxon) is growth-challenged on the production front,” he added.

With fewer major new discoveries coming in, and legacy wells flat or declining, oil companies are seeing the cost of a barrel of oil rising. Their response appears to be moving to leaner operations, avoid huge expensive projects, and return profits to shareholders. ExxonMobil slashed capital expenditures by 28 percent for the quarter. Shell is undergoing a two-year, $15 billion divestiture campaign. BP plans on divesting $10 billion from its Alaskan assets, and returning much of the cash to shareholders.

Divestment has led to a flurry of deals in the first quarter – the most in over a decade, in fact. “Divestitures are driving activities as companies continue to back their core operations,” said Doug Meier of PricewaterhouseCoopers, according to Fuel Fix. “They’re shedding those non-core assets to reinvest in their core business or make profits available to shareholders.”

The inability to boost production has the companies spending less on new projects to reduce costs. This may soothe the concerns of investors in the short-term, but it means that the companies will not be able to lift production over the long-term. In any event, we may be hitting an inflection point; Big Oil’s size may have peaked, and to stay profitable, companies have no choice but to shrink.

By. Nicholas Cunningham of Oilprice.com




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Tamas on May 02 2014 said:
    Hi Nick,

    great anaylsis. I do not get something though. In your analysis as I understand it looks like that we have a supply problem in long-term which indicates for me that oil prices will rise.

    On the other side, WTI crude oil prices decline and I read everywhere it is because in the US the inventories and production contiously expand so there is an increased supply which drives down the prices.

    Based on your experience and analysis, what do you think, how are the prices affected and will be changing in the future?

    Thanks,
    Tamas
  • David Hrivnak on May 02 2014 said:
    With WTI and Brent both near record high levels, and I could say record levels during peacetime, I see where we have plateaued. In the late 90's oil routinely sold under $20/barrel and now it is $100. I can't think of any other good or service up 500% in the same time period.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
Download on the App Store Get it on Google Play