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Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana Paraskova

Tsvetana is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing for news outlets such as iNVEZZ and…

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Goldman: OPEC Must Raise Production

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While many market participants view the recent talk of OPEC potentially raising oil production by as much as 1 million bpd as a bearish factor for oil prices, Goldman Sachs continues to be very bullish on oil, and thinks that OPEC not only needs to lift production, but it is mandatory that they do so.

“Everybody is all bearish about the recent announcement of a million barrels per day extra supply, but the market needed it. It not only needs it, it is mandatory. Otherwise you just drive the bus off a cliff,” Goldman Sachs’s Head of Global Commodity Research Jeff Currie said at the S&P Global Platts annual crude oil summit in London on Tuesday, as carried by MarketWatch.

Supply will not be enough to keep up with strong global demand and stockpiles will continue to drain in the second half of this year, even if OPEC were to boost oil production by 1 million bpd, according to Currie.

The United States has quietly asked Saudi Arabia and several other OPEC nations to raise oil production by some 1 million bpd, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday, quoting people familiar with the matter.

Concerns over a potential loss of some of Iran’s oil exports and the collapsing Venezuelan production supported an oil price rally for most of May, until reports emerged at the end of last month that OPEC’s largest producer Saudi Arabia and its key non-OPEC partner in the production cut deal, Russia, were talking about lifting the combined oil production of the countries from the pact by some 1 million bpd, potentially easing the cuts in response to supply concerns amid rising oil prices.

According to Goldman Sachs—which has been bullish on oil for a while despite the recent oil price correction—oil demand growth in China is “a lot higher than what anybody thinks,” Currie said.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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  • dryhole dutton on June 07 2018 said:
    as the current trend in oil price is downward, despite looming iranian oil production curtailment due to sanctions over its nuclear ambitions, and the continuing venezuelan oil industry collapse, goldman-sach's importuning of opec to increase is disingenuous, at best.

    investment bankers are complicit in the flooding of the global energy market with light "oil", lease condensate, and shale gas; the effect of which is to drive down commodity prices below that which is needed for financial viability, and infrastructure investment.

    as markets collapsed, and engineers were furloughed, en masse, neither wall street, nor the federal government, offered admonishments to shale producers to reign in overproduction. the effects of the resultIng drain in technical capability will become self-evident once the shale plays begin their immutable decline; however, it will be too late as the lifecycle for conventional oil plays is typically 10 years from inception to first oil.

    from the cold-stacking of deep water drill ships, to the shuttering of offshore fabrication facilities, to the loss of technical/engineering capability due to sustained lack of capital investment, the unnaturally suppressed commodity prices resultant from the shale revolution the shale boom will likely come to be seen as a shale boondoggle.
  • Herry on June 07 2018 said:
    CRIPES !!!! Stop ripping off the consumer !!

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