• 17 hours Trump's top energy adviser resigns
  • 9 hours Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 14 hours Mike Pompeo, CIA Chief, Met Secretly with NK Leader Kim Jong-un
  • 4 hours New EV ETF Bets Bigger on BHP than Tesla
  • 10 hours Is Today's Tesla News Good or Bad?
  • 2 days Supreme Court drops DOJ case against Microsoft
  • 20 hours No lower offshore drilling royalty rates
  • 19 hours Oil Prices Hit Highest Level Since 2014
  • 14 hours Anybody Watching Aluminum Stocks Today??
  • 18 hours EIA Inventory Data (Wednesdays)
  • 1 day VW To Introduce Autonomous Parking In 2020
  • 11 hours Trump: "Larry, go get it done,'” - US to rejoin TPP
  • 1 day Venezuela gives Oil Minister 'Extra Powers' to halt production decline
  • 2 days How much pain is Qatar in as it goes for first bond sale since blockade?
  • 2 days Patent for a Healthy Future: Plastic-Eating Enzyme Holds Promise In Fighting Pollution
  • 2 days Net Income At Saudi Aramco Tops $33 bn in the first half of 2017!
Irina Slav

Irina Slav

Irina is a writer for the U.S.-based Divergente LLC consulting firm with over a decade of experience writing on the oil and gas industry.

More Info

Trending Discussions

Colombia Pipeline Bombing Takes 210,000 Bpd Off The Market

Pipeline

A bombing of the Cano Limon oil pipeline in Colombia has led to the suspension of crude flow, sources from Ecopetrol and Colombia’s army told Reuters. Leftist militant group ELN was behind the attack, the sources said, who declined to be identified ahead of an official announcement.

Some crude oil spilled as a result of the bombing in a nearby river, the sources added.

Cano Limon is Colombia’s second-biggest oil pipeline, with a daily capacity of 210,000 bpd, which carries crude oil from the Cano Limon field near the border with Venezuela to a refinery on Colombia’s Caribbean coast. The Cano Limon field and the 780-km pipeline are jointly operated by Ecopetrol and Occidental Petroleum.

The attack against the Cano Limon infrastructure is the latest in a string of bombings over a period of 17 years, resulting in 167 deaths and the spilling of a total 66 million gallons of crude, Reuters notes, citing figures from Ecopetrol. Because of the attacks, the Cano Limon pipeline has been shut down for almost a third of its life so far.

The government and ELN, or the National Liberation Army, started peace talks early this year, but this has not stopped the ELN from attacking oil infrastructure. The organization, which is considered a terrorist group by the U.S. and the EU, is against any foreign oil company operating in Colombia, on the grounds that they exploit Colombia’s natural resources without benefit to the local population.

The ELN is not the only militant group active in Colombia: FARC, or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, warred with the government for decades before last year they signed a peace treaty that led thousands of guerilla fighters to turn in their weapons and return to civilian life, which is good news for the industry—in theory. In practice, potential investors are likely to adopt a wait-and-see attitude to ensure the peace deal will hold as attacks from militants on oil infrastructure continue.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News