• 4 minutes Phase One trade deal, for China it is all about technology war
  • 7 minutes IRAN / USA
  • 11 minutes Shale Oil Fiasco
  • 16 minutes Swedes Think Climate Policy Worst Waste of Taxpayers' Money in 2019
  • 5 hours China's Economy and Subsequent Energy Demand To Decelerate Sharply Through 2024
  • 5 hours Indonesia Stands Up to China. Will Japan Help?
  • 5 hours Beijing Must Face Reality That Taiwan is Independent
  • 7 hours Gravity is a scam!
  • 24 hours What's the Endgame Here?
  • 4 hours US Shale: Technology
  • 2 days 10 Rockets hit US Air Base in Iraq
  • 1 day Canada / Iran
  • 2 days Wind Turbine Blades Not Recyclable
  • 2 days Tales From The Smoke Shack and beyond.
  • 10 mins Prototype Haliade X 12MW turbine starts operating in Rotterdam
  • 2 days IRAQ / USA
ZeroHedge

ZeroHedge

The leading economics blog online covering financial issues, geopolitics and trading.

More Info

Premium Content

Europe Is Still Addicted To Coal

The end of the age of fossil fuels is not yet in sight in EuropeAs Statista's Martin Armstrong illustrates in the following infographic, there are still a number of countries that generate a very large proportion of their electricity from coal.

At the same time, not all countries have announced a date for phasing out its use. This applies in particular to those countries that have a high proportion of coal-fired electricity. Despite recent efforts to transition to renewable energy, Germany still lies in the upper quarter of the country comparison, behind countries such as Poland, Czechia, Greece and Bulgaria. The government is aiming to phase out coal by 2038.

Scientists are demanding a move away from electricity generation from coal. The prevention of climate change can only be achieved by a complete abandonment of fossil fuels. In addition, electricity from renewable energies can be produced more cheaply than electricity from fossil fuels - taking into account the resulting costs of health and climate damage. In Poland, for example, many people suffer health problems from the consequences of high levels of air pollution. Nevertheless, there is no prospect of a swift turn away from coal. One reason for this is that jobs in the five-digit region depend on coal production.

Global coal production has risen again recently, with around 8 billion tonnes of coal mined in 2018. Countries such as China, Russia and the USA contributed to the increase.

By Zerohedge.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage




Leave a comment
  • Mamdouh Salameh on September 28 2019 said:
    In 2018 coal accounted for more than 27% of global primary energy consumption, an increase of 1.44% over 2017. However, coal consumption in Europe declined by 2.7% in 2018 from the 2017 levels.

    There are three reasons why Europe is still addicted to coal for electricity generation. The first is a shift away from nuclear energy for electricity generation. The second is that renewables are not able to offset the loss of nuclear electricity. The third reason is that European countries where coal mining provides significant employment opportunities are not going to rush to abolish coal.

    Take the case of Germany. Germany has rushed to decommission its nuclear energy but was forced to repeatedly delay its decommissioning and resort to coal because renewable energy couldn’t offset the loss of nuclear electricity.

    Coal remains the world’s third biggest primary energy source despite being challenged by serious environmental policies and despite a global expenditure of $3.0 trillion on renewable energy during the last decade.

    Dr Mamdouh G Salameh
    International Oil Economist
    Visiting Professor of Energy Economics at ESCP Europe Business School, London
  • One Second on December 30 2019 said:
    What are these percentages from 2017? Gross or net? The net electricity of coal and lignite combined in Germany in 2019 will be below 30%. Gross numbers only inflate the importance of coal since their inefficiency comes off as a bonus in this metric. In any case the coal percentage in Germany dropped significantly in the last two years even with the ongoing nuclear phaseout.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News