• 3 hours Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 9 hours Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 10 hours Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 12 hours Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 1 day Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 1 day Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 1 day China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 1 day UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 1 day Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 1 day VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 1 day Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 1 day Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 1 day OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 2 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 2 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 2 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 2 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 2 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 2 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 5 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 5 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 5 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 5 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 5 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 6 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 6 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 6 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 6 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 6 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 6 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
  • 6 days India Needs Help To Boost Oil Production
  • 6 days Shell Buys One Of Europe’s Largest EV Charging Networks
  • 6 days Oil Throwback: BP Is Bringing Back The Amoco Brand
  • 6 days Libyan Oil Output Covers 25% Of 2017 Budget Needs
  • 6 days District Judge Rules Dakota Access Can Continue Operating
  • 7 days Surprise Oil Inventory Build Shocks Markets
  • 7 days France’s Biggest Listed Bank To Stop Funding Shale, Oil Sands Projects
  • 7 days Syria’s Kurds Aim To Control Oil-Rich Areas
  • 7 days Chinese Teapots Create $5B JV To Compete With State Firms
  • 7 days Oil M&A Deals Set To Rise
What’s Stopping An Oil Price Rally?

What’s Stopping An Oil Price Rally?

Oil prices rallied in Q3…

Can India Overtake China In The EV Revolution?

Can India Overtake China In The EV Revolution?

India wants to drastically increase…

EU Slashes Carbon Permits, Increasing Cost of Pollution

The European Union’s move to prop up the price of carbon pollution in its greenhouse gas trading market could result in significant increases in carbon prices. The EU slashed in half the amount of carbon permits it will auction off this year, and the smaller supply could force prices up by 34% this year, according to a median survey of analysts put together by Bloomberg. The EU will take the extra permits and “backload” them, or reintroduce them into the carbon market at the end of the decade.

The EU carbon market, the world’s largest, is valued at about $47 billion. Around 13,000 factories and utilities are required to participate. They must obtain enough permits – each equivalent to the right to emit one metric ton of carbon pollution – to offset their annual emissions. If they do not, they must pay a fine. On the news that the EU will backload permits, the price to emit a metric ton of carbon jumped by 10% to 4.85 euros, or $6.65. The price hit a 9 month low at the end of March. A Reuters survey suggests that prices could rise to around 6.95 euros in the second quarter, and then further to 7.55 euros in the second half of 2014. Higher prices will increase costs to heavy industry, as well as producers and users of oil, gas, and coal.

The move was seen as necessary to give the carbon market teeth, after years of oversupply. The sluggish European economy, coupled with real declines in emissions, have led to a glut of permits. With emissions low and permits well-supplied, the price cratered.

The EU may consider longer-term fixes to the carbon market such as automatic cuts in permit supply. While the bloc had originally planned to implement those fixes starting in 2021, a few member countries such as Germany and Denmark support an earlier move, perhaps as soon as 2016.

By Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News