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World’s Largest Wild Salmon Population Threatened by Giant Alaskan Mine

World’s Largest Wild Salmon Population Threatened by Giant Alaskan Mine

Seven months ago the EPA completed an assessment of the affects that the proposed Pebble Mine would have on Alaskan Lands and wildlife, stating that the effects were minimal and approving the plans to begin developing the mine.

12 independent scientists then reviewed the assessment and found that the EPA had massively underestimated the risks, forcing the EPA to perform a re-assessment.

Northern Dynasty of Canada, and Anglo-American Plc of Britain, hold the mining right to the Pebble Mine through the means of a joint venture called the Pebble Partnership. They hope to mine billions of tonnes of raw gold and copper ores, worth half a trillion dollars, in what would be the world’s largest open pit mine at 2 miles long and 2,000 feet deep.

Estimates suggest that the mine would also produce 10 billion tonnes of toxic waste which, according to Yahoo News, would last for generations, or possibly even forever.

Related article: Alaska Mulls Oil Industry Tax Break to Boost Production

The EPA’s latest assessment states that the development of the mine would destroy as much as 4,800 acres of wetlands, and nearly 100 miles of streams, including the natural habitat of the 37.5 million sockeye salmon, the world’s largest wild salmon population) that travel each year to the Bristol Bay watershed to spawn.

A mixture of fishermen, environmentalists, and Native communities, have united to oppose the mine, worried that it could destroy the local environment, ways of life, and $480 million in annual economic revenue.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



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  • skeptic on May 03 2013 said:
    Well Kurt, you've got it all figured out. Since the developers will have a hell of a time finding a way to build what they are proposing in this amazingly wet part of Alaska, you should apply for a job and they'd certainly pay you handsomely. But first you should probably learn a bit about this particular prospect and the incredible challenges it faces. Storing 10 billion tons of toxic mine waste likely isn't quite as easy as you put forth in what, 4 sentences?
  • Kurt Larrecou on May 03 2013 said:
    The plan is great all they have to due is dig two excavations, primary and secondary and line them with an imperious layer on all sides and top as necessary to crib for remediation.
    This would result in No toxic surface Outfall's of any substances.
    The borrow pit that will be filled with all waste generated must be excavated fist and the material such as A Horizon soil, B Horizon, and C Bedrock must be banked to go to glory hole for minerals as progressive infill as a linear repair from most fragile wetlands to the end of the excavation. The water to sustain and re-mediate must be collected in the initial primary hole and segregated from toxic waste.

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