• 5 minutes Trump vs. MbS
  • 15 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 9 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 1 hour US top CEO's are spending their own money on the midterm elections
  • 9 hours Petrol versus EV
  • 1 hour EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
  • 22 mins WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 33 mins The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 3 hours OPEC Is Struggling To Deliver On Increased Output Pledge
  • 1 hour The Balkans Are Coming Apart at the Seams Again
  • 14 hours E-mopeds
  • 6 hours 10 Incredible Facts about U.S. LNG
  • 5 hours U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 3 hours Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 1 hour A $2 Trillion Saudi Aramco IPO Keeps Getting Less Realistic
  • 1 day These are the world’s most competitive economies: US No. 1
  • 1 day The end of "King Coal" in the Wales
Are U.S. Oil Exports Really Unstoppable?

Are U.S. Oil Exports Really Unstoppable?

U.S. crude oil exports hit…

Rig Count Rises Amid Oil Price Recovery

Rig Count Rises Amid Oil Price Recovery

The active number of rigs…

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala

Zainab Calcuttawala is an American journalist based in Morocco. She completed her undergraduate coursework at the University of Texas at Austin (Hook’em) and reports on…

More Info

Wine For Oil: Alberta’s Revenge

Wine bottle

An ongoing trade battle between British Columbia and Alberta over a crude oil pipeline expansion project grew in scope on Monday, after an announcement that BC planned to challenge the rival province’s ban of its wine, according to a new report by Reuters.

The Canadian Free Trade Agreement (CFTA) does not allow such bans between provinces, BC argues. Alberta authorized a halt in BC wine imports earlier in February after BC proposed new rules to block shipments of oil, potentially jeopardizing the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

Alberta is an oil-rich province that needs new pipelines to transport its fossil fuels to its refinery customers, but BC argues that it proposed the ban on shipping tankers to protect its environment from the dangers of spills.

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers is against the politicization of the conflict between the governments of Alberta and British Columbia concerning the latter’s unwillingness to accept the Trans Mountain oil pipeline expansion projects, the group said earlier this month.

Responding to comments made by the leader of the Alberta United Conservative Party, Jason Kenney, CAPP’s head, Tim McMillan, said "We want to see the politicization mellowed on all sides. Any time that trade issues get ramped up and there's a politicization of them, people get injured, businesses get injured. Our hope is that the elected leaders can find a path through this.”

Last week, Canada’s National Energy Board gave Kinder Morgan the go-ahead to start construction work on a tunnel entrance in British Columbia’s Burnaby Mountain that will be part of the controversial pipeline expansion. Though this is a rare piece of good news for Kinder Morgan in the Trans Mountain saga, it does not mean that the pipeline construction will soon begin. The NEB has yet to approve about half of the pipeline’s route, and there are also other permits to collect and lawsuits to see the end of.

By Zainab Calcuttawala for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:


x

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News