• 4 minutes England Running Out of Water?
  • 7 minutes Trump to Make Allies Pay More to Host US Bases
  • 10 minutes U.S. Shale Output may Start Dropping Next Year
  • 14 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 7 hours One Last Warning For The U.S. Shale Patch
  • 54 mins Once Upon A Time... North Korea Abruptly Withdraws Staff From Liaison Office
  • 6 hours Oil Slips Further From 2019 Highs On Trade Worries
  • 3 hours Chile Tests Floating Solar Farm
  • 4 hours Poll: Will Renewables Save the World?
  • 2 hours Modular Nuclear Reactors
  • 13 hours China's E-Buses Killing Diesel Demand
  • 9 hours China's Expansion: Italy Leads Europe Into China’s Embrace
  • 13 hours Trump sells out his base to please Wallstreet and Oil industry
  • 24 hours Russian Effect: U.S. May Soon Pause Preparations For Delivering F-35s To Turkey
  • 23 hours Trump Tariffs On China Working
  • 1 hour US-backed coup in Venezuela not so smooth
  • 7 hours New Rebate For EVs in Canada
  • 22 hours Biomass, Ethanol No Longer Green
Why This Oil Price Rally Has A Limit

Why This Oil Price Rally Has A Limit

While oil markets are tightening…

University of Exeter Researchers Create Bacteria that Produce Diesel On-Demand

A research team from the University of Exeter, working with the support of Royal Dutch Shell, has developed a process that enables bacteria to produce diesel on demand. The diesel, produced by specially manufactured strands of the E. Coli bacteria, is almost identical to conventional diesel, meaning that it doesn’t need to be blended with other petroleum products, as is often the case with biofuels.

Another benefit of its similarity to traditional diesel is that it can be added to existing supplies, flowing through existing infrastructure, pipelines, tankers, and even engines do not need any modification.

Professor John Love from the University said that “producing a commercial biofuel that can be used without needing to modify vehicles has been the goal of this project from the outset.

Related article: Big Numbers, Big Profits: The Fleetingly Lucrative RIN Trade

Replacing conventional diesel with a carbon neutral biofuel in commercial volumes would be a tremendous step towards meeting our target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Global demand for energy is rising and a fuel that is independent of both global oil price fluctuations and political instability is an increasingly attractive prospect.”

E. Coli bacteria naturally turns sugars into fat in order to build its cell membranes, and by altering this process slightly the bacteria produces synthetic fuel molecules. The process can be easily repeated in laboratories, but there still remain some problems that must be solved before large-scale production is possible.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News