• 5 minutes Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 11 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 17 minutes Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 23 mins WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 7 hours Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 2 hours Newspaper Editorials Across U.S. Rebuke Trump For Attacks On Press
  • 4 hours WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 6 hours Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 6 hours Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 7 hours Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
  • 5 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 3 hours Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 21 hours Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 21 hours California Solar Mandate Based on False Facts
  • 10 hours Again Google: Brazil May Probe Google Over Its Cell Phone System
  • 10 hours Don't Expect Too Much: Despite a Soaring Economy, America's Annual Pay Increase Isn't Budging

Study Finds 21% of Homes Produce 50% of Carbon Emissions

In the battle against climate change and carbon emissions policy makers tend to focus on the supply side of things. They concentrate emission reduction efforts on power plants, heating systems, and cars, and completely forget about the demand side of the equation.

A new study has been published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, which looks at the differences in energy demand amongst different houses.

The study was carried out by a team of scientists led by Dominik Saner, who found that that energy used to run personal vehicles added to the energy used to run a home, actually makes up for more than 70 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions.

Related article: Nuclear Energy Innovation is Vital for Slowing Climate Change

This means that tackling the demand side of energy use could be a far more effective way of reducing carbon emissions.

The study monitored more than 3,000 houses in a town in Switzerland, and discovered that 50 percent of greenhouse gas emissions were attributable to just 21 percent of the homes. This means that implementing energy conservation techniques in just a small number of houses could have a far larger impact on the volume of carbon dioxide emitted.

Science Daily wrote that the reason that a few families had such a disproportionate environmental footprint, was due to larger living spaces, that required more energy to heat, light, cool, etc., and longer commutes for workers, therefore meaning that they drive the car more.

The study concluded that “if their emissions could be halved, the total emissions of the community would be reduced by 25 percent.”

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News