• 4 minutes England Running Out of Water?
  • 7 minutes Trump to Make Allies Pay More to Host US Bases
  • 10 minutes U.S. Shale Output may Start Dropping Next Year
  • 14 minutes Washington Eyes Crackdown On OPEC
  • 9 hours One Last Warning For The U.S. Shale Patch
  • 5 hours Modular Nuclear Reactors
  • 14 hours Once Upon A Time... North Korea Abruptly Withdraws Staff From Liaison Office
  • 5 hours Oil Slips Further From 2019 Highs On Trade Worries
  • 14 hours Chile Tests Floating Solar Farm
  • 5 hours Poll: Will Renewables Save the World?
  • 1 day China's E-Buses Killing Diesel Demand
  • 1 day Trump sells out his base to please Wallstreet and Oil industry
  • 1 day China's Expansion: Italy Leads Europe Into China’s Embrace
  • 4 hours Read: OPEC THREATENED TO KILL US SHALE
  • 2 days Russian Effect: U.S. May Soon Pause Preparations For Delivering F-35s To Turkey
  • 2 days Trump Tariffs On China Working
  • 2 days Biomass, Ethanol No Longer Green
  • 24 hours New Rebate For EVs in Canada
Gas Mergers Could Pressure Prices In Europe

Gas Mergers Could Pressure Prices In Europe

The merger of the PEG-Nord…

Scientists Develop Wave Energy Device That Generates Low-Cost Electricity

Rough Sea

Engineers from Scotland and Italy have developed a new wave energy technology that could generate low-cost electricity for thousands of homes.

Engineers from the University of Edinburgh and from several universities in Italy have designed, developed, and tested a device that costs less than conventional designs and that can be incorporated into existing ocean systems, the University of Edinburgh has said in a statement, describing the scientists’ study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A scientific magazine.

The ocean and sea waves can provide a source of renewable energy, but few wave energy converters have moved past pre-commercial stage because of the high costs and the often harsh marine environment, the authors of the paper argue.

So they designed the so-called Dielectric Elastomer Generator (DEG) using flexible rubber membranes. The device is cheaper than conventional designs, has fewer moving parts, and uses durable materials, the engineers say.

The device was designed to be placed on top of a vertical tube in the sea. As sea waves pass the tube, the water inside it pushes trapped air above to inflate and deflate the generator placed on top of the device.

“As the membrane inflates, a voltage is generated. This increases as the membrane deflates, and electricity is produced. In a commercial device, this electricity would be transported to shore via underwater cables,” the University of Edinburgh said.

The engineers carried out water tests on a smaller scale in a circular tank reproducing any combination of currents and ocean waves. According to the scientists, the device could replace expensive moving parts and complex air turbines.

“Wave energy is a potentially valuable resource around Scotland’s coastline, and developing systems that harness this could play a valuable role in producing clean energy for future generations,” Professor David Ingram of the University of Edinburgh’s School of Engineering said.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • Bill Simpson on February 18 2019 said:
    Saltwater is heavy, corrosive, and incompressible. It will tear those things up in a few years. Go with the giant wind turbines, and concrete dams for pumped storage.
    Check out what the Canadians did in French speaking Quebec with the Hydro-Quebec James Bay Project. That is how it's done, in a climate like Siberia too.

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News