• 3 minutes e-car sales collapse
  • 6 minutes America Is Exceptional in Its Political Divide
  • 11 minutes Perovskites, a ‘dirt cheap’ alternative to silicon, just got a lot more efficient
  • 2 hours GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 4 days Does Toyota Know Something That We Don’t?
  • 4 days World could get rid of Putin and Russia but nobody is bold enough
  • 7 hours America should go after China but it should be done in a wise way.
  • 7 days OPINION: Putin’s Genocidal Myth A scholarly treatise on the thousands of years of Ukrainian history. RCW
  • 6 days China is using Chinese Names of Cities on their Border with Russia.
  • 7 days Russian Officials Voice Concerns About Chinese-Funded Rail Line
  • 7 days CHINA Economy IMPLODING - Fastest Price Fall in 14 Years & Stock Market Crashes to 5 Year Low
  • 6 days CHINA Economy Disaster - Employee Shortages, Retirement Age, Birth Rate & Ageing Population
  • 7 days Putin and Xi Bet on the Global South
  • 7 days "(Another) Putin Critic 'Falls' Out Of Window, Dies"
  • 8 days United States LNG Exports Reach Third Place
  • 8 days Biden's $2 trillion Plan for Insfrastructure and Jobs
Canada’s Oil Majors Are Sitting Out The Energy M&A Wave

Canada’s Oil Majors Are Sitting Out The Energy M&A Wave

Experts are predicting that it’s…

How Next-Gen Biomanufacturing Can Help Slash Global Emissions

How Next-Gen Biomanufacturing Can Help Slash Global Emissions

Osaka University researchers have developed…

Saudi Arabia’s Shale Gas Hopes Dashed Due to Lack of Water

Much of Saudi Arabia’s conventional natural gas is produced as a by-product of the crude oil extraction. Nearly all is then re-injected back into the well in order to maintain the reservoir pressure. What little may remain is allocated to industrial projects such as petrochemical expansion. The result of all of this is that there is very little natural gas to be used in power plants for electricity generation, so Saudi Arabia has had to use large amounts of oil to burn in the power plants, and this volume has been increasing as the energy demands of the growing economy have increased.

The shale boom in the US has opened up the possibility of a new source of potentially cheap and abundant natural gas for Saudi Arabia, which could be used as a source of power generation, freeing up more oil for export.

Recent comments made by the Saudi Arabian oil minister, Ali Al-Naimi, has suggested that Saudi Aramco will soon begin to explore the country’s shale gas resources; resources that are estimated to be in the region of 600 trillion cubic feet.

Related article: US: Fracking Regulations for Federal Lands?

One major problem stands in the way of a Saudi shale boom that was not as much of an issue in the US, the fact that huge amounts of water are needed for the fracking process, a resource that is in very short supply in the Middle East.

Already the water demand from cities and industry in Saudi Arabia exceeds the available supply from aquifers, leading to the requirement of 27 desalination facilities which deliver nearly 300 billion gallons of water each year. Each hydraulically fractured shale well requires several million gallons of water, raising a small question about the logic of pursuing such a technology in such a dry country.

There are a few methods that can reduce the amount of water needed for fracking. The US frackers, especially around the Marcellus shale play in Pennsylvania, recycle between 10% and 30% of all water injected into the wells; using nitrogen foam mixed in with the fracking fluid can also reduce the amount of water needed; and finally tests have been made in Canada on the possibility of using gelled propane as a form of waterless fracking.

Information sourced from Geoff Styles' article: http://energyoutlook.blogspot.mx/2013/04/will-water-limit-fracking-in-arabia.html

ADVERTISEMENT

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment

Leave a comment

EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News