• 2 days Shell Oil Trading Head Steps Down After 29 Years
  • 3 days Higher Oil Prices Reduce North American Oil Bankruptcies
  • 3 days Statoil To Boost Exploration Drilling Offshore Norway In 2018
  • 3 days $1.6 Billion Canadian-US Hydropower Project Approved
  • 3 days Venezuela Officially In Default
  • 3 days Iran Prepares To Export LNG To Boost Trade Relations
  • 3 days Keystone Pipeline Leaks 5,000 Barrels Into Farmland
  • 3 days Saudi Oil Minister: Markets Will Not Rebalance By March
  • 3 days Obscure Dutch Firm Wins Venezuelan Oil Block As Debt Tensions Mount
  • 4 days Rosneft Announces Completion Of World’s Longest Well
  • 4 days Ecuador Won’t Ask Exemption From OPEC Oil Production Cuts
  • 4 days Norway’s $1 Trillion Wealth Fund Proposes To Ditch Oil Stocks
  • 4 days Ecuador Seeks To Clear Schlumberger Debt By End-November
  • 4 days Santos Admits It Rejected $7.2B Takeover Bid
  • 4 days U.S. Senate Panel Votes To Open Alaskan Refuge To Drilling
  • 4 days Africa’s Richest Woman Fired From Sonangol
  • 5 days Oil And Gas M&A Deal Appetite Highest Since 2013
  • 5 days Russian Hackers Target British Energy Industry
  • 5 days Venezuela Signs $3.15B Debt Restructuring Deal With Russia
  • 5 days DOJ: Protestors Interfering With Pipeline Construction Will Be Prosecuted
  • 5 days Lower Oil Prices Benefit European Refiners
  • 5 days World’s Biggest Private Equity Firm Raises $1 Billion To Invest In Oil
  • 6 days Oil Prices Tank After API Reports Strong Build In Crude Inventories
  • 6 days Iraq Oil Revenue Not Enough For Sustainable Development
  • 6 days Sudan In Talks With Foreign Oil Firms To Boost Crude Production
  • 6 days Shell: Four Oil Platforms Shut In Gulf Of Mexico After Fire
  • 6 days OPEC To Recruit New Members To Fight Market Imbalance
  • 6 days Green Groups Want Norway’s Arctic Oil Drilling Licenses Canceled
  • 6 days Venezuelan Oil Output Drops To Lowest In 28 Years
  • 6 days Shale Production Rises By 80,000 BPD In Latest EIA Forecasts
  • 7 days GE Considers Selling Baker Hughes Assets
  • 7 days Eni To Address Barents Sea Regulatory Breaches By Dec 11
  • 7 days Saudi Aramco To Invest $300 Billion In Upstream Projects
  • 7 days Aramco To List Shares In Hong Kong ‘For Sure’
  • 7 days BP CEO Sees Venezuela As Oil’s Wildcard
  • 7 days Iran Denies Involvement In Bahrain Oil Pipeline Blast
  • 9 days The Oil Rig Drilling 10 Miles Under The Sea
  • 10 days Baghdad Agrees To Ship Kirkuk Oil To Iran
  • 10 days Another Group Joins Niger Delta Avengers’ Ceasefire Boycott
  • 10 days Italy Looks To Phase Out Coal-Fired Electricity By 2025
When Will Oil Demand Begin To Taper Off?

When Will Oil Demand Begin To Taper Off?

As energy analysts begin announcing…

The Hidden Cost Of Electric Cars

The Hidden Cost Of Electric Cars

As countries across the globe…

Russian Retaliation: How Will Turkish Gas Supplies Be Affected?

Russian Retaliation: How Will Turkish Gas Supplies Be Affected?

Moscow has no plan to cut off its supply of gas to Turkey in response to its downing of a Russian jet fighter, but that doesn’t mean Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t furious with Ankara.

Hours after Tuesday’s incident, Russia's deputy energy minister, Anatoly Yanovsky, said the gas will be delivered according to the contract signed by the two countries. “It could not have been otherwise,” he said.

That would be fortunate for Turkey, which is heavily dependent on other countries for its energy, importing about 95 percent of it, including 55 percent or 27 billion cubic meters of the gas it consumes from Russia.

Related: Big Oil: Which Are The Top 10 Biggest Oil Companies?

Turkey says one of its F-16 fighters shot down the Russian Sukhoi Su-24 while it was in Turkish air space after the pilot repeatedly ignored warnings that it return to Syrian air space. Putin responded that the Russian jet never got within a kilometer of Turkey’s border; that, like Turkey, it was targeting Islamic State (IS) targets in the Syrian province of Latakia; and that it presented no threat to Turkey. “This incident stands out against the usual fight against terrorism,” Putin said. “Our troops are fighting heroically against terrorists, risking their lives. But the loss we suffered today came from a stab in the back delivered by accomplices of the terrorists.”

The key word here is “accomplices,” because the Russian leader suggested that the Turkish government has played a role in financing the operations of IS, also known as ISIS and Daesh. He said his government has long known about shipments of oil moving to Turkey from areas of Syria controlled by terrorists, and that the money to pay for the oil finances such groups.

Related: As Prices Tank, This Natural Gas Exporter Became A Net Importer

“IS has big money, hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars, from selling oil,” Putin said. “ In addition, they are protected by the military of an entire nation. One can understand why they are acting so boldly and blatantly, why they kill people in such atrocious ways, why they commit terrorist acts across the world, including in the heart of Europe.”

Putin said he is baffled by the incident. “We have always treated Turkey as not only a close neighbor, but also as a friendly nation,” he said. “I don’t know who has an interest in what happened today, but we certainly don’t.”

The incident came at a sensitive time for Western powers fighting the Islamic State in various parts of the Middle East. News of the shoot down came as French President Francois Hollande was in Washington to try to persuade President Obama to join with Russia in a stronger alliance against IS. The incident involving the jets, though, only intensified tensions between Moscow and NATO.
Still, at least one political analyst in Turkey says any action taken by Putin against Ankara is likely to be political, not economic.

Related: Oil Prices Down As Storage Keeps On Filling Up

“I don’t think the situation between the two countries will have an economic dimension,” political columnist Ugur Gurses told the Turkish newspaper Today’s Zaman. “In the past Russia did not immediately react economically to countries with which it was engaged in a dispute.” Gurses pointed to the continued flow of gas to European countries, even though they joined with the United States to impose harsh economic sanctions on Russia because of its unilateral annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula in March 2014.

The reason? Russia needs the money. According to Gurses, “Due to falling [oil] prices, the economy constricted,”and therefore, “On the topic of the downed plane, [Russia] won’t adopt a ‘let’s-close-the-valve’ attitude. The political reverberations will be more contentious.”

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • Alex on November 26 2015 said:
    Interestingly, back in 2012, when the Syrian Air Force shot down a Turkish plane for repeatedly violating Syrian airspace, Erdogan was furious and said that a brief violation of a country's airspace shouldn't be a pretext to shoot down a plane.
    And now, we can see double-standards at their best. Even if the Russian plane hypothetically violated Turkish airspace for a short period of time it wasn't a reason to shoot it down. There definitely were other options to solve the problem.
  • Alex on November 26 2015 said:
    Ankara is preparing to annex the North Part of Syria. So it is furious about Russia's
    activity in this country. This is the key for SU-24 accident!

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News