• 2 days Shell Oil Trading Head Steps Down After 29 Years
  • 2 days Higher Oil Prices Reduce North American Oil Bankruptcies
  • 3 days Statoil To Boost Exploration Drilling Offshore Norway In 2018
  • 3 days $1.6 Billion Canadian-US Hydropower Project Approved
  • 3 days Venezuela Officially In Default
  • 3 days Iran Prepares To Export LNG To Boost Trade Relations
  • 3 days Keystone Pipeline Leaks 5,000 Barrels Into Farmland
  • 3 days Saudi Oil Minister: Markets Will Not Rebalance By March
  • 3 days Obscure Dutch Firm Wins Venezuelan Oil Block As Debt Tensions Mount
  • 3 days Rosneft Announces Completion Of World’s Longest Well
  • 4 days Ecuador Won’t Ask Exemption From OPEC Oil Production Cuts
  • 4 days Norway’s $1 Trillion Wealth Fund Proposes To Ditch Oil Stocks
  • 4 days Ecuador Seeks To Clear Schlumberger Debt By End-November
  • 4 days Santos Admits It Rejected $7.2B Takeover Bid
  • 4 days U.S. Senate Panel Votes To Open Alaskan Refuge To Drilling
  • 4 days Africa’s Richest Woman Fired From Sonangol
  • 5 days Oil And Gas M&A Deal Appetite Highest Since 2013
  • 5 days Russian Hackers Target British Energy Industry
  • 5 days Venezuela Signs $3.15B Debt Restructuring Deal With Russia
  • 5 days DOJ: Protestors Interfering With Pipeline Construction Will Be Prosecuted
  • 5 days Lower Oil Prices Benefit European Refiners
  • 5 days World’s Biggest Private Equity Firm Raises $1 Billion To Invest In Oil
  • 6 days Oil Prices Tank After API Reports Strong Build In Crude Inventories
  • 6 days Iraq Oil Revenue Not Enough For Sustainable Development
  • 6 days Sudan In Talks With Foreign Oil Firms To Boost Crude Production
  • 6 days Shell: Four Oil Platforms Shut In Gulf Of Mexico After Fire
  • 6 days OPEC To Recruit New Members To Fight Market Imbalance
  • 6 days Green Groups Want Norway’s Arctic Oil Drilling Licenses Canceled
  • 6 days Venezuelan Oil Output Drops To Lowest In 28 Years
  • 6 days Shale Production Rises By 80,000 BPD In Latest EIA Forecasts
  • 6 days GE Considers Selling Baker Hughes Assets
  • 7 days Eni To Address Barents Sea Regulatory Breaches By Dec 11
  • 7 days Saudi Aramco To Invest $300 Billion In Upstream Projects
  • 7 days Aramco To List Shares In Hong Kong ‘For Sure’
  • 7 days BP CEO Sees Venezuela As Oil’s Wildcard
  • 7 days Iran Denies Involvement In Bahrain Oil Pipeline Blast
  • 9 days The Oil Rig Drilling 10 Miles Under The Sea
  • 9 days Baghdad Agrees To Ship Kirkuk Oil To Iran
  • 10 days Another Group Joins Niger Delta Avengers’ Ceasefire Boycott
  • 10 days Italy Looks To Phase Out Coal-Fired Electricity By 2025
The War That Would Transform Oil Markets

The War That Would Transform Oil Markets

Tensions between Saudi Arabia and…

New Battery Design Could Crush Tesla

New Battery Design Could Crush Tesla

Elon Musk’s old rival, Henrik…

Putting Structural Material On A Diet

Putting Structural Material On A Diet

The albatross for transportation, in so many ways, is fuel: its cost, its volume, and its weight.

Sure, sci-fi movies show city-sized spacecraft wafting their interstellar courses as if they were wisps of smoke, but getting them off the ground is another matter altogether.

So the lighter the vessel, less force – and therefore less fuel – is needed. And engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL, think they have found the answer.

An account of the research by MIT uses the Washington Monument and the Eiffel Tower as examples of soaring architecture: one whose strength is based on heavy stone, the other based on an airy latticework of steel. All the MIT and LLNL engineers did was reduce this to a microscale.

They’ve designed a new system that could draw on many different materials, whether metals, ceramics or polymers, and they believe their structures may have achieved record rigidity for a given weight.

Such structures would be useful in any application that needs rigidity, strength and lightweight because of their low density. That would include spacecraft, of course, but also on smaller items such as smart phone batteries, which today make the devices almost unnaturally heavy.

Related Article: Latest Oil Train Derailment Adds Pressure For Stronger U.S. Action

The MIT and LLNL engineers made these micro-lattices with a highly precise 3-D printing technique called projection micro-stereolithography, which the two teams of engineers have been working on since 2008.

In “Ultralight, Ultrastiff Mechanical Metamaterials,” published in the June 20 issue of the journal Science, the researchers report that they overcame the weight issue by reducing density without making the structure weak and brittle, the way osteoporosis weakens bones.

Their MIT-LLNL materials, regardless of their nature, “can withstand a load of at least 160,000 times their own weight," said LLNL Engineer Xiaoyu “Rayne” Zheng, lead author of the article. "The key to this ultrahigh stiffness is that all the micro-structural elements … do not bend under [the] applied load.”

So how good is this material? According to the Science article, the MIT-LLNL materials are 100 times stiffer than other ultra-lightweight lattice materials previously reported in academic journals.

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News