• 45 mins UK On Track To Approve Construction of “Mini” Nuclear Reactors
  • 5 hours LNG Glut To Continue Into 2020s, IEA Says
  • 7 hours Oil Nears $52 With Record OPEC Deal Compliance
  • 10 hours Saudi Aramco CEO Affirms IPO On Track For H2 2018
  • 12 hours Canadia Ltd. Returns To Sudan For First Time Since Oil Price Crash
  • 13 hours Syrian Rebel Group Takes Over Oil Field From IS
  • 3 days PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 3 days Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 3 days Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 3 days Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 3 days Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 3 days Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 3 days Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 3 days New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 4 days Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 4 days Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 4 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 4 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 4 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 4 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 4 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 4 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 4 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 4 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 5 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 5 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 5 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 5 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 5 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 6 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 6 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 6 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 6 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 6 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 6 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 6 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 6 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 6 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 7 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 7 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
Where To Look For Value This Earnings Season

Where To Look For Value This Earnings Season

Energy majors are about to…

LNG Becomes A Buyer’s Market

LNG Becomes A Buyer’s Market

A continuous growing supply of…

‘Poo Power:’ Gas From Human Waste Will Heat British Homes

‘Poo Power:’ Gas From Human Waste Will Heat British Homes

Human waste is certainly plentiful, but clean? In fact, it is -- if used the right way. That’s why some British utilities are planning to harness the biomethane gas produced at sewage treatment plants to create residential power for cooking and heating.

“Our customers could be at home frying sausages on gas generated at our sewage treatment works,” Mohammed Saddiq, general manager of GENeco, Wessex Water’s energy company, told The Independent.

The idea isn’t entirely new. For thousands of years, primitive peoples used dried animal manure as fuel – some tribal cultures still do. Utility companies have also used waste product to generate electricity, but only onsite. But this is the first time biomethane will be treated to be suitable for home use. Gas will move straight from sewage plants into the National Grid.

Related: U.S. Firm Angers Dubliners With Plan For Waste-to-Energy Generator

The environmental benefits could be huge, said Dragan Savic, a professor of hydroinformatics at Exeter University. He explained that emissions from the more than 9,000 sewage treatment plants in the United Kingdom are toxic. “Greenhouse-gas emissions reductions could be significant as the methane normally generated at sewage works is 25 times more harmful to the atmosphere than carbon dioxide. By capturing methane and pumping it into the National Grid, water companies could turn from greenhouse-gas emitters into renewable-energy generators.”

The British Environment Agency says the UK water industry uses about 8,100 gigawatt hours of energy each year and emits over 4 million tons of greenhouse gases.

Severn Trent and Northumbrian Water are also on board with the plan.

Here’s how “poo power” works. The Severn Trent plant treats waste from about 2.5 million people. The resulting sludge is washed, compressed and tested for ignition quality and to ensure it smells like normal methane gas. Then it’s pumped into the grid to power its customers’ homes.

Related: Study Finds Treated Fracking Wastewater Still Too Toxic

It may sound “a little unsavory,” Simon Farris, Severn Trent’s renewable energy development manager, told Bloomberg News. But he stressed that “there’s lots and lots of power locked in poo, and when that’s processed, it’s perfect to generate clean renewable green gas.”

There remains one unsavory byproduct, though: Sewage sludge. Severn Trent said in a statement that this matter is fed to “concrete cows” that work like giant cow’s stomachs to convert the sludge into gas. So far the utility uses 40 percent of this energy, but plans to use more of it in the future.

In fact, Farris said, energy is Severn Trent’s second-highest operating cost, and the use of biomethane has helped it save well over a million dollars a year on gas production.

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News