• 2 minutes U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes
  • 5 minutes “Cushing Oil Inventories Are Soaring Again” By Tsvetana Paraskova
  • 7 minutes United States LNG Exports Reach Third Place
  • 3 hours Joe Biden's Presidency
  • 3 hours So Is COVID a Media Hoax or Not?
  • 2 hours Navalny Poisoning Weakens Russo German Relations
  • 5 hours Biden suspends oil and gas drilling on Federal Lands for 60 days for review.
  • 2 hours GENERAL NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF: The Third Tour
  • 5 hours Parler’s New Partner Has Ties to the Russian Government
  • 3 hours The World Economic Forum & Davos - Setting the agenda on fossil fuels, global regulations, etc.
  • 7 hours a In 2020, we produced and delivered half a million cars.
  • 7 hours CIA Death Squads
  • 10 hours An exciting development in EV Aviation: Volocopter
  • 13 hours Rejoining Paris Climate Accord is Devestating
  • 10 hours Did I Miss Something?
  • 11 hours The Debate Starts : Remake Republican Party vs. Third Party
Pipeline Woes Hit Libya Oil Production

Pipeline Woes Hit Libya Oil Production

A leak that forced the…

Low Lithium Prices Could Hold Back The EV Revolution

Low Lithium Prices Could Hold Back The EV Revolution

One of lithium's leading producers,…

Onshore Wind Capacity In The US Tops 100 GW

Total installed onshore wind power capacity in the United States has already exceeded 100 gigawatts (GW), with more than half of that nameplate capacity installed over the past seven years, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said on Monday.  

Wind, together with solar power, has been one of the fastest growing energy sectors this year.

Onshore wind capacity in the U.S. has surged in recent years, more than tripling over the past decade, according to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA).

The largest oil-producing region in the United States, Texas, is also the American champion in wind power installation and electricity generation. As of the third quarter of this year, Texas had the most onshore wind capacity installed—26.9 GW—followed by Iowa, Oklahoma, and Kansas. These four states accounted for half of all installed onshore wind capacity in the U.S.  

A total of 41 states had at least one installed wind turbine at the end of Q3, according to the EIA.

Texas has accounted for more than 25 percent of U.S. wind electricity generation in each of the past three years, the EIA said earlier this year. Texas, Iowa, Oklahoma, and Kansas generated more than half of the U.S. electricity from wind power in 2018.

According to AWEA’s annual report for 2018, total U.S. wind power capacity increased by 8 percent in 2018 to 96,433 MW. This was more than double the capacity that the U.S. had in 2010.

As of the end of September 2019, the installed operating wind capacity in the U.S. had increased to 100,125 MW, or more than 100 GW, the association’s figures show.

The industry supported 114,000 jobs in 2018 across all states, and added last year 8,500 wind power jobs, including well-paying jobs in wind turbine service, construction, engineering, and manufacturing. The wind power sector contributes more than US$1 billion in annual revenue for states and communities that host wind farms.

Last year, wind energy generated 6.5 percent of America’s electricity, enough to power 26 million homes, according AWEA.   

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News