• 5 minutes Iran Says It Arrested 17 CIA Spies, Some Sentenced To Death
  • 9 minutes Will We Ever See 100$+ OIL?
  • 13 minutes Iran downs US drone. No military response . . Just Destroy their economy. Can Senator Kerry be tried for aiding enemy ?
  • 8 mins Platts says if Iran's 2 mm bbls exports comes back on market oil goes to $40 . . . What about new Permian pipelines 2.47 mm bbls coming ? . . . WHAT IF BOTH IRAN AND PERMIAN TOTAL 4.47 mm added bbls . . . OMG !
  • 22 hours Iran Loses $130,000,000 Oil Revenue Every Day They Continue Their Games . . . .Opportunity Lost . . . Will Never Get It Back. . . . . LOL .
  • 8 hours Today President Trump Questioned U.S. Policing the Straits of Hormuz for Rich Asian Countries. Allies Britain and Japan were asked to participate. Said NO. US spends $100 Billion/year Protecting Mideast Shipping Lanes!
  • 15 hours Renewables provided only about 4% of total global energy needs in 2018
  • 3 hours So You Think We’re Reducing Fossil Fuel? — Think Again
  • 26 mins Millions of Barrels of Iranian Oil Are Piled Up in China’s Ports
  • 11 hours Oil Giant Saudi Arabia Is Set to Start First Wind-Power Plant
  • 7 hours N.Y. Governor Signs Climate Bill
  • 1 day How is E&P of Marginal Oil on the UKCS Similar to the Shale Oil Operations in the US?
  • 11 hours EIA Reports Are Fraudulent : EIA Is Conspiring With Trump To Keep Oil Prices Low
  • 4 hours U.S. Administration Moves To End Asylum Protections For Central Americans
  • 1 day Berkeley becomes first U.S. city to ban natural gas in new homes
  • 2 days Shale Oil will it self destruct?
The Two Most Important Catalysts For Oil

The Two Most Important Catalysts For Oil

Oil prices never stay quiet…

China Records Rare Drop In Gasoline Output

China Records Rare Drop In Gasoline Output

China just reported a drop…

Nuclear Power Plants Appear Safe From Flooding In Midwest And South

Heavy rains have brought historic floods to the St. Louis region on the eve of the New Year, causing the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers to overflow.

The high water levels are traveling south, potentially bringing major flooding to Mississippi and Louisiana. That raises the question about the safety of the nuclear power plants located in the vicinity of the floods.

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is closely watching the situation, but the nuclear watchdog said that it does not expect the floods to adversely affect any of the plants. In a January 5 update, the NRC ran through some of the specific reactors located in the flooding zone.

Related: Petro Currencies Under Fire As Oil Keeps Sliding

Nebraska has the Fort Calhoun and Cooper power plants, and the NRC says the Missouri River probably won’t be high enough to force the plants to take protective measures. The same is true for the Callaway plant in Missouri.

The Mississippi River is expected to crest on January 15 in Mississippi, but the Grand Gulf Station in the state shouldn’t be affected. Louisiana’s River Bend and Waterford Stations should also be in the clear. All three of these plants are operated by Entergy.

Related: These Two New Sources Of Financing Give Hope To The Energy Industry

After the Fukushima meltdown in Japan, the U.S. tightened safety requirements on nuclear power plants. Each plant is required to prove that it can withstand extreme flooding and shut down safely if it needs to. The plants have back up diesel generators to ensure no interruption of electric power to keep the plant cool occurs.

But the latest floods could be harbinger of greater risks in the future if flooding worsens with climate change. Nuclear power plants are intentionally cited near bodies of water, such as rivers or the ocean, because of large reactor cooling needs. In the past, power plants have been forced to shut down during severe storms, including reactors in Louisiana during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and in Florida during Hurricane Andrew in the early 1990s.

Related: Oil Touches $32 Handle As Panic Takes Hold Of Chinese Markets

Sea level rise will also present threats to a handful of plants located along the Atlantic seaboard and the Gulf Coast. The industry and the NRC are confident that the nation’s nuclear power plants can withstand severe storms and other flood risks. The nuclear industry is in the process of implementing a strategy its calls FLEX, which encompasses stationing vital emergency equipment, including generates and backup power, in multiple locations so that it can be deployed to plants in need during emergency events.

By Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • B Tilles on January 08 2016 said:
    Under the FLEX program, are nuclear operators ensuring that their emergency back up diesels will not be inundated by a severe hurricane storm surge (Fukushima style) or are they also bolstering access to off-site power in case the diesels fail?
  • Jamie on January 08 2016 said:
    Key word "Appear"

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
Download on the App Store Get it on Google Play