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The Real Impact Of Diesel Bans

The Real Impact Of Diesel Bans

Diesel bans will be coming…

Nigerian Activists Plan Worldwide Protest Over Electricity Shortages

The Nigerian Million March Project has announced its intention to organize peaceful marches in major cities around the world to call attention to the Nigerian government's failure to provide sufficient and reliable electricity to its 150 million citizens, despite the country being Africa’s largest oil exporter.

The marches, scheduled for 24 October, are planned for the capital Abuja, Lagos, Port Harcourt, the Nigeria High Commission in London, the Van Ness UDC Metro Station in Washington and the Consulate General of Nigeria in New York.

The march’s slogan is “Let there be light in Nigeria,” Abuja’s Daily Trust newspaper reported. March organizers are urging participants to get a Nigerian flag, draw up a homemade sign, to sport white and green apparel to represent that national flag’s colors as well as wearing comfortable shoes and to bring a bottle of water along with a healthy and good attitude.

The issue of reliable and affordable electricity has become an increasingly contentious issue in Nigeria. Last month Nigeria’s National Electricity Regulatory Commission chairman, Sam Amadi, issued an official statement noting that electricity tariffs were to be revised upwards beginning in January 2012, and that Nigerians would start paying between 50 and 100 percent more for electricity usage.

By. Charles Kennedy, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



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