• 9 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 11 minutes The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 19 minutes Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 1 hour Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 2 hours CO2 Emissions Hit 67-Year Low In USA, As Rest-Of-World Rises
  • 8 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 10 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 14 hours Is NAFTA dead? Or near breakthrough?
  • 14 hours Are Trump's steel tariffs working? Seems they are!
  • 13 hours How To Explain 'Truth Isn't Truth' Comment of Rudy Giuliani?
  • 10 hours The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
  • 5 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 1 hour China goes against US natural gas
  • 4 hours Saudi PIF In Talks To Invest In Tesla Rival Lucid
  • 5 hours Film on Venezuela's staggering collapse
  • 8 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
Iran Sanctions Could Backfire On U.S. Drillers

Iran Sanctions Could Backfire On U.S. Drillers

After the U.S. announced new…

New Rechargeable Battery Could Accelerate EV Adoption

New Rechargeable Battery Could Accelerate EV Adoption

University of Michigan researchers have…

Nigerian Activists Plan Worldwide Protest Over Electricity Shortages

The Nigerian Million March Project has announced its intention to organize peaceful marches in major cities around the world to call attention to the Nigerian government's failure to provide sufficient and reliable electricity to its 150 million citizens, despite the country being Africa’s largest oil exporter.

The marches, scheduled for 24 October, are planned for the capital Abuja, Lagos, Port Harcourt, the Nigeria High Commission in London, the Van Ness UDC Metro Station in Washington and the Consulate General of Nigeria in New York.

The march’s slogan is “Let there be light in Nigeria,” Abuja’s Daily Trust newspaper reported. March organizers are urging participants to get a Nigerian flag, draw up a homemade sign, to sport white and green apparel to represent that national flag’s colors as well as wearing comfortable shoes and to bring a bottle of water along with a healthy and good attitude.

The issue of reliable and affordable electricity has become an increasingly contentious issue in Nigeria. Last month Nigeria’s National Electricity Regulatory Commission chairman, Sam Amadi, issued an official statement noting that electricity tariffs were to be revised upwards beginning in January 2012, and that Nigerians would start paying between 50 and 100 percent more for electricity usage.

By. Charles Kennedy, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News