• 4 minutes Nord Stream 2 Halt Possible Over Navalny Poisoning
  • 8 minutes America Could Go Fully Electric Right Now
  • 11 minutes JP Morgan says investors should prepare for rising odds of Trump win
  • 3 hours US after 4 more years of Trump?
  • 1 hour Something wicked this way comes
  • 2 days Daniel Yergin Book is a Reality Check on Energy
  • 6 hours Why NG falling n crude up?
  • 3 hours Oil giants partner with environmental group to track Permian Basin's methane emissions
  • 3 days Permian in for Prosperous and Bright Future
  • 2 days Famine, Economic Collapse of China on the Horizon?
  • 3 days YPF to redeploy rigs in Vaca Muerta on export potential
  • 3 days Top HHS official takes leave of absence after Facebook rant about CDC conspiracies
  • 3 days Gepthermal fracking: how to confuse a greenie
  • 1 day The Perfect Solution To Remove Conflict Problems In The South China East Asia Sea
  • 1 hour Biden NOW says he supports Fracking
  • 2 days Open letter from Politico about US-russian relations
The Secret To Survival For Canada’s Oil Sands

The Secret To Survival For Canada’s Oil Sands

Canada’s oil sands are often…

What’s Next For Gold?

What’s Next For Gold?

The Fed recently issued a…

New Shipping Lanes Open Up as the Arctic Melts

A team at the University of California – Los Angeles (UCLA) has conducted a study into the effects of global warming, and the subsequent melting of sea ice, on Arctic shipping lanes.

They created two scenarios and, using independent climate forecasts for 2040 to 2059, created their own predictions as to the impact of global temperature increases on the ability of ships to traverse Arctic waters. One of the scenarios assumed that global carbon emissions would increase by 25%, the other worked on a 10% increase.

They managed to conclude that the difference between the two carbon scenarios was minimal, and that by the middle of the century even ordinary ships will be able to sail parts of the Arctic that were previously considered inaccessible, without the need of large icebreakers.

Related article: China's Smog Becoming an International Issue

Laurence C. Smith, a geography professor at the UCLA, stated that “this development is both exciting from an economic development point of view and worrisome in terms of safety, both for the Arctic environment and for the ships themselves.

No matter which carbon emission scenario is considered, by mid-century we will have passed a crucial tipping point — sufficiently thin sea ice — enabling moderately capable icebreakers to go where they please.”

This development would enable a direct shipping route right over the North Pole; a route that is 20% shorter than today’s most-trafficked Arctic shipping lane, the Northern Sea Route around the northern coast of Russia.

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News