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U.S. Shale Has A Glaring Problem

U.S. Shale Has A Glaring Problem

Even after more than two…

New Peel-and-Stick, Thin-Film Solar Cell can Provide Power on Any Surface

Researchers at Stanford University have teamed up with the US Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to create a thin film solar cell which can be stuck on any surface, and could help provide power to personal devices.

Stanford initially invented the peel-and-stick printing technology to be used in the production of nanowire based electronics.

The NREL developed an amorphous silicon thin-film solar cell that is lightweight, flexible, and transparent, and attached it to Stanford’s thermal release stick-and-peel tape.

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When exposed to a high temperature for just a few seconds the solar cells can be peeled off the silicon substrate base and applied directly to any surface.

The solar cells can be easily stuck to the surface of buildings on a large scale, or to portable devices such as laptops and cell phones as a constant source of renewable energy.

Now that the technology has been tested successfully, the team of researchers will work to improve the efficiency of the module so that each cell can generate more power.

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



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