• 3 minutes Could EVs Become Cheaper than ICE Cars by 2023?
  • 6 minutes Your idea of oil/gas prices next ten years
  • 12 minutes WTI Heading for $60
  • 5 hours Is California becoming a National Security Risk to the U.S.?
  • 13 hours Plastic Myth-Busters
  • 12 hours At U.N. climate talks, US Administration Plans Sideshow On Coal
  • 7 hours A Sane Take on Nord Stream 2
  • 14 hours Good Sign for US Farmers: Soybean Prices Signals US-China Trade Deal Progress
  • 21 hours Soybean sale to China down 94%
  • 8 hours I Believe I Can Fly: Proposed U.S. Space Force Budget Could Be Less Than $5 Billion
  • 15 mins UK Power and loss of power stations
  • 20 hours what's up with NG?
  • 11 hours OPEC Builds Case For Oil Supply Cut
  • 2 days Starbucks slashing its corporate workforce
  • 2 days New Oil Order- Diplomacy, Geopolitics and Economics
  • 2 days Pros and Cons of Coal

MIT Develop Simple, Fast, Efficient Method of Cleaning Up Oil Spills

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have proposed a new oil spill clean-up technique which is set to be simple, fast, and energy efficient.

MIT hope to use magnets to strip the oil from the water. The whole system will be highly efficient and all parts of the system are recyclable, including the oil extracted from the water.

The idea is simple. The spilled oil would be pumped out of the sea and onto a ship where it is mixed with a water repellent ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are a magnetic liquid which contain tiny nano-magnets in a suspension. The ferrofluid would basically magnetise the oil only, allowing a large set of magnets to separate the oil from the water with an incredibly high degree of efficiency. The ferrofluid can then be separated from the oil in another part of the process.

This method for cleaning oil from water not only achieves an excellent separation, but it also uses far less energy than conventional techniques, and as the whole process can take place on-board a ship there is no need for energy to transport the oil and water mixture to land to be separated.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment
  • Hans Nieder on September 16 2012 said:
    Splendid, however, is this for a ship leak or a gulf gusher ?

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News