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Lockheed Predict Working Nuclear Fusion Reactor within 10 Years

Nuclear fusion, the ultimate power source, the energy of the future’ that is how it has been described, yet the major problem is that so far it has been virtually impossible to create on a sustainable level.

Traditional nuclear power plants operate reactors that run on nuclear fission. Nuclear fusion in comparison is safer, easier to contain, easier to shut down, far more energy efficient, and produces less radioactive waste.

The goal of nuclear fusion has been pursued for around 60 years, yet due to the demanding conditions that must be met for fusion to take place it has never been fully achieved. However just recently Lockheed Skunk Works has announced that it may be just ten years away from producing a fusion based nuclear power plant.

Related article: Why is Iran Going Nuclear?

Many designs for fusion reactors involve massive investment and construction of huge scientific apparatus which can take years to be completed before they can start to generate power. The resources and infrastructure needed to research and build fusion reactors can only usually be provided by governments, not exactly an expense that they want to shoulder during such tight economic times.

Lockheed’s proposal is enticing due to the fact that it is far smaller than other fusion reactor designs. The plan uses a compact cylinder, rather than the traditional bulky ring, which provides a far stronger magnetic containment field and leaves fewer points where energy can escape.

Lockheed plans to start testing a prototype model in 2017, and scale it up to a full production model by 2022.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com


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  • Ryan on February 25 2013 said:
    relax tom.
  • Sam Blankenship on February 25 2013 said:
    This sounds similar to LENR devices scheduled for announcement in a few months.
  • Tom on February 20 2013 said:
    I think it is wonderful that we can look forwad to a working fusion reactor in just 10 years. Thats a huge improvement over the 20 yrs that its been for the last 60 or 70 yrs. I guess 10yrs means in 30 or 40 yrs we can look forward to a forcast of 5 yrs.

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