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Indonesia's First Nuclear Power Plant Delayed

Indonesia’s National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan) head Hudi Hastowo told journalists about the country’s nuclear energy efforts, stating, "The use of nuclear (energy) in Indonesia will not be for war weaponry, but for human peace and prosperity."

As for Indonesia’s nuclear power plant development plan Hudi noted that the 11 March Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan had impacted government plans to construct the country’s first nuclear power plant in Tanjung Ular Muntok Cape region, West Bangka, stating, "After the major earthquake in Japan that hit Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant caused some radioactive leakage, the plan is now delayed whereas it was previously accepted by the public," Jakarta’s government-owned Antara news agency reported.

Experts noted that the proposed Tanjung Ular Muntok nuclear power plant is situated in a seismically active region and that a repeat of the December 2004 tsunami that devastated the country could cause a catastrophic disaster. Currently Indonesia’s main power source is coal.

Indonesia currently has three nuclear research reactors – Kartini, Siwabessy and the Triga Mark II nuclear research facility.

If Indonesia does decide to develop a nuclear power industry, it has two uranium mines, Remaja-Hitam and Rirang-Tanah Merah in western Kalimantan and Borneo.

By. Joao Peixe, Deputy Editor OilPrice.com



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