• 5 minutes Mike Shellman's musings on "Cartoon of the Week"
  • 11 minutes Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
  • 17 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 9 hours The Discount Airline Model Is Coming for Europe’s Railways
  • 16 hours Pakistan: "Heart" Of Terrorism and Global Threat
  • 2 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 2 hours Venezuela set to raise gasoline prices to international levels.
  • 14 hours Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 day Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 5 mins Renewable Energy Could "Effectively Be Free" by 2030
  • 1 day Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 1 day Newspaper Editorials Across U.S. Rebuke Trump For Attacks On Press
  • 1 hour Are Trump's steel tariffs working? Seems they are!
  • 24 hours WTI @ 69.33 headed for $70s - $80s end of August
  • 16 hours Scottish Battery ‘Breakthrough’ Could Charge Electric Cars In Seconds
  • 8 hours Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
Saudi Crackdown On Canada Could Backfire

Saudi Crackdown On Canada Could Backfire

The Saudi/Canadian spat that started…

The Real Leader In Global Energy Production

The Real Leader In Global Energy Production

Last week President Trump was…

Great Britain Installs more Small Wind Capacity than the US in 2011

Some good news for the British wind industry, and also the Department of Energy and Climate Change; in 2011 Great Britain installed more small wind generation capacity than the US, and that trend is expected to continue in 2012.

Since the introduction of the FiT program in 2010, small wind capacity has increased by about 50% with 23 megwatts being installed in 2011, compared to the US’s 19 megawatts. Overall wind capacity is still much lower in Great Britain than in the US or China, but the FiT program has only be running for a couple of years, whereas their programs have been around for a couple of decades.

The British FiT program was designed to encourage microgeneration and small scale installations. The utilites pay a fixed tariff to companies who generate electricity from small wind installations, and then earn profits when they sell the electricity onto the homeowners.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News