• 7 minutes Get First Access To The Oilprice App!
  • 11 minutes Japanese Refiners Load First Iran Oil Cargo Since U.S. Sanctions
  • 13 minutes Oil prices forecast
  • 17 minutes Renewables in US Set for Fast Growth
  • 3 hours Chinese FDI in U.S. Drops 90%: America's Clueless Tech Entrepreneurs
  • 8 hours Socialists want to exorcise the O&G demon by 2030
  • 6 hours Good Marriage And Bad Divorce: Germany's Merkel Wants Britain and EU To Divorce On Good Terms
  • 18 hours Cheermongering about O&G in 2019
  • 39 mins Russian Message: Oil Price War With U.S. Would Be Too Costly
  • 1 day Duterte's New Madness: Philippine Senators Oppose President's Push To Lower Criminal Age To 9
  • 2 days Is Natural Gas Renewable? I say yes it is.
  • 1 day North Sea Rocks Could Store Months Of Renewable Energy
  • 10 hours *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 2 hours Oil CEOs See Market Rebalancing as Outlook Blurred by China Risk
  • 2 days Making Fun of EV Owners: ICE-ing Trend?
  • 2 days Emissions from wear of brakes and tyres likely to be higher in supposedly clean vehicles, experts warn
  • 23 hours Oceans "Under Fire" Of Plastic Trash

First Publically Available Electric Plane

In recent years more and more vehicle types have been designed to be hybrid, or fully electric, in an attempt to reduce reliance on petroleum products and reduce carbon emissions. The latest vehicle to receive a “green” makeover is the aeroplane.

Traditionally engineers struggled to develop electric planes due to the low energy density of batteries; they were too heavy and could not provide sufficient power. Paul Peterson, founder and CEO of Volta Volare, the aeronautics company based in Portland, Oregon, said that due to the vast amount of research and progress over the last few years, electric car batteries now have a sufficient energy density to make hybrid planes possible.

This spring his company will begin to test its four passenger GT4, which runs a hybrid powertrain similar to the one found in a Chevy Volt, where batteries are backed up by a petrol engine. The GT$ will take off and then cruise for 300 miles on its batteries alone. Whenever the power level in the batteries drops to 25% a 1.5 litre, supercharged petrol engine will automatically kick-in and start to recharge the batteries. The 23 gallon tank will help to add an extra 1,000 miles of range.

A 200 mile and hour flight in a single engine, private jet would consume about $80 of aviation fuel, whereas the same flight in the GT4 would only consume $20 of electricity. The electric motor would also be far easier and cheaper to maintain, and Peterson hopes that these savings will help make private jets much cheaper and more accessible to the public.

As battery technology continues to improve the petrol engine could be removed, converting the GT4 into a fully electric aircraft.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News