• 3 days Nuclear Bomb = Nuclear War: Saudi Arabia Will Develop Nuclear Bomb If Iran Does
  • 2 days Statoil Changes Name
  • 3 days Tillerson just sacked ... how will market react?
  • 2 days Russian hackers targeted American energy grid
  • 2 days Is $71 As Good As It Gets For Oil Bulls This Year?
  • 3 days Petrobras Narrows 2017 Loss, Net Debt Falls Below $85bn
  • 3 days Proton battery-alternative for lithium?
  • 3 days Ford Recalls 1.38 Million Vehicles (North America) For Loose Steering Wheel Bolt
  • 2 days Oil Boom Will Help Ghana To Be One Of The Fastest Growing¨Economies By 2018!
  • 2 days Country With Biggest Oil Reserves Biggest Threat to World Economy
  • 3 days I vote for Exxon
  • 2 days HAPPY RIG COUNT DAY!!
  • 3 days UK vs. Russia - Britain Expels 23 Russian Diplomats Over Chemical Attack On Ex-Spy.
  • 3 days Why is gold soooo boring?
  • 3 days South Korea Would Suspend Five Coal - Fire Power Plants.
  • 2 days Spotify to file $1 billion IPO
Will Rosneft Move Forward In The Arctic Without Exxon?

Will Rosneft Move Forward In The Arctic Without Exxon?

U.S. sanctions against Russia have…

Canada Is Facing A Heavy Crude Crisis

Canada Is Facing A Heavy Crude Crisis

Canada’s heavy crude oil saw…

Dakota Access Pipeline Gets Final Go-Ahead

Dakota access pipeline

The Dakota Access pipeline project, hampered by months of protests that led to a suspension by the Obama administration, has now received the approval of the U.S. Army, after President Trump signed an executive order allowing the project to proceed.

According to a court filing, the Army will issue a permit for the final stretch of the pipeline – the one that was disputed by environmentalists and Native American tribes – and construction could begin as soon as June.

The US$3.8-billion project sparked opposition from a local tribal community, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, who argued it will pass through sacred lands and pose a threat to its drinking water supply as it would pass under the Lake Oahe. The Standing Rock was joined by environmental activists at the site of the pipeline, in North Dakota, where they spent several months protesting.

Prompted by the opposition, the then Assistant Army Secretary for Civil Works Jo-Ellen Darcy refused to grant the Army’s permit to Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the Dakota Access project, on the grounds that a new environmental study was necessary. The decision was made despite the findings of an earlier 2016 study, which concluded that the pipeline would pose no significant threat to the local community’s drinking water.

Related: Keystone XL Needs Much Higher Oil Prices To Be Viable

As the administration changed, with the energy industry high on Trump’s agenda, it was only a matter of time for the project to get the approval of the White House, and it did not take long. Approval from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was the last hurdle that the project needed to clear.

Opposition continues, however, with the Standing Rock vowing to continue the fight. Support is also strong. The latest news in this respect came from Seattle, whose City Council voted unanimously to sever all ties with banking major Wells Fargo because of its involvement as lender with the pipeline project.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

More Top Reads from Oilprice.com:

Join the discussion | Back to homepage

Leave a comment

Leave a comment

Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News