• 4 minutes The Federal Reserve and Money...Aspects which are not widely known
  • 8 minutes How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy
  • 12 minutes  What Russia has reached over three months diplomatic and military pressure on West ?
  • 35 mins GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 3 hours Is Europe heading for winter of discontent with extensive gas shortages?
  • 12 hours Sand Powered Batteries for Heating Industries and Homes
  • 5 days Once seen as fleeting, a new solar tech proves its lasting power
  • 3 hours "How to Calculate Your Individual ESG Score to ensure that your Digital ID 'benefits' and money are accessible"
  • 2 hours Oil Stocks, Market Direction, Bitcoin, Minerals, Gold, Silver - Technical Trading <--- Chris Vermeulen & Gareth Soloway weigh in
  • 3 hours "The Global Digital ID Prison" by James Corbett of CorbettReport.com
  • 2 days Bloomberg - "Hedge Funds Hit by ‘Onerous’ ESG Rule Turn to Lawyers for Help"

Creating Artificial Geothermal Spots to Power the US

Traditional geothermal engineering generates renewable energy by tapping into naturally occurring reservoirs of water that have been heated by geothermal energy within deep within the Earth’s crust. It is clean and renewable, but unfortunately the number of locations around the world that has the required geology to build geothermal power plants, are very limited.

Enhanced geothermal engineering (EGS) is an artificial alternative that greatly increases the number of viable locations to build a geothermal facility. It works by pumping water deep into the ground to force open natural fissures in order to create artificial reservoirs of water that can then be heated by the Earth’s natural geothermal energy.

Related article: Geothermal Energy: More Exciting than Media Thinks

In October 2012, a group of scientists and engineers working in the Deschutes National Forest in Oregon, near to the crater of the Newbury Volcano, began pumping 11 million gallons of water 10,000 feet underground at a rate of around 375 gallons a minute. The water was forced into narrow fissures in the crust at a pressure of 2,400 pounds per square inch, expanding the natural cracks in the rock to create an artificial reservoir.

The company undertaking this operation is AltaRock Energy, and it hopes to use the superheated water to work turbines on the surface and provide renewable power for the local area. It believes that the technology, whilst expensive (the Newbury plant will cost around $$ million to develop, whereas a similar plant using traditional geothermal energy would only cots between $5 and $20 million), could be used almost anywhere in the world, and could soon be used to generate as much as 10% of US energy.

By. Joao Peixe of Oilprice.com



Join the discussion | Back to homepage



Leave a comment
  • Mary Yamashita on June 09 2013 said:
    Unfortunate $typo. How much does that Newbury plant cost to develop?

Leave a comment

EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News