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Compact Fusion Reactor Within A Decade, Says Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin says it’s within a decade of producing a fusion reactor that’s 90 percent smaller than previous designs.

The stakes are high, and so is the enthusiasm and skepticism about Lockheed’s announcement. After all, fusion could generate much more energy much more cleanly than today’s power plants that rely on nuclear fission.

But fusion reactors are elusive. So far, no researcher has been able to wring more energy from a fusion reactor than is needed to power it up.

Related: Is France’s Love Affair with Nuclear Over?

Most efforts to create a fusion reactor have focused on containing hot plasma, a highly ionized gas, within strong magnetic fields in what’s called a “tokamak,” a doughnut-shaped device. Some of these tokamaks already being built or tested are enormous, including the world’s largest – 30 meters tall – at an international laboratory in France known as ITER. Its projected cost is $50 billion.

In an interview with MIT Technology Review, Tom McGuire, who leads Lockheed’s fusion research, said the aerospace, defense and security company has developed a compact reactor based on what he called “magnetic mirror confinement,” which is designed to contain plasma by reflecting particles from high-density magnetic fields to low-density fields.

By “compact” Lockheed means that its research reactor measures two meters long and one meter wide, much smaller than its rivals. And according to McGuire, it’s not small for small’s sake. He argues that the reduced size makes operations and hardware revisions quicker and more efficient. “That is a much more powerful development paradigm and much less capital intensive,” he said.

Small also means that a working fusion reactor of this size might easily fit in a tractor-trailer and be taken to a remote site to generate 100 megawatts of power. He concedes, “There are no guarantees that we can get there, but that possibility is there.”

Already, Lockheed’s fusion reactor team has conducted 200 firings with plasma at its research facility in Palmdale, Calif., known as Skunk Works, but it hasn’t yet produced any data on their results. Still, McGuire said, the plasma “looks like it’s doing what it’s supposed to do.”

Related: How Fusion Energy Could One Day Disrupt Energy Markets

Balancing McGuire’s enthusiasm is some understandable skepticism. For example, Joel Gilmore of Australia-based ROAM Consulting told Spaceflight Insider, “Fusion requires incredibly high temperatures and pressures, which is challenging, and a lot of people have been working on fusion for a long time. So I won’t get too excited yet.”

The same goes for Ian Hutchinson, a processor of nuclear science and engineering at MIT. He says the few diagrams and commentary that he’s been able to see indicate that Lockheed’s effort is “purely speculative, as if someone has drawn a cartoon and said they are going to fly to Mars with it.”

But both Gilmore and Hutchinson agree that if Lockheed’s research pans out, it would represent a huge technological leap forward.

By Andy Tully of Oilprice.com

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  • John Scior on October 24 2014 said:
    It would be really nice to see a breakthrough that would provide environmentally friendly as well as economically cheap and abundant energy. I look at the nuclear fission industry as a model and wonder what might be i store or nuclear fusion. Are protesters worried about an explosion a possibility ? What if the breakthrough is made and yet the cost of fueling the reactor is still very high ???

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