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James Burgess

James Burgess

James Burgess studied Business Management at the University of Nottingham. He has worked in property development, chartered surveying, marketing, law, and accounts. He has also…

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As Extreme Weather Increases, US Communities Look to be More Independent

As Extreme Weather Increases, US Communities Look to be More Independent

In the US it is generally the local governments that are left to respond to any extreme weather events, which are becoming more and more common as the climate changes. Despite the $188 billion in damage wrought by extreme weather since 2011, the federal government still denies that a problem exists, so local leaders have decided to take their own course of action.

Over 50 mayors and county elected officials have banded together to launch the Resilient Communities for America (RC4A) campaign, that will aim to create strong communities, able to meet their own energy needs, and withstand any heat waves, floods, droughts, severe storms, and wildfires with minimal outside help.

As proof that four out of every five Americans live in a county that has been hit by a federally declared weather related disaster during the last six years, the supporters come from all over the US; from Sacramento and Denver to Des Moines and Washington DC, according to Clean Technica.

Related Article: As Climate Change Worsens, US Corn Ethanol becomes Uneconomical

Kevin Johnson, the mayor of Sacramento, and chair of the RC4A campaign, said that “a new national movement is emerging, led by mayors who believe that now is the time to take powerful, proactive steps to safeguard our communities, adapt to extreme weather and energy challenges, and transform adversity into economic opportunity.”

The RC4A campaign has listed four broad actions that it suggests in order to increase a community’s resilience against extreme weather: preparing for climate change and extreme weather, expanding renewables and energy efficiency, renewing infrastructure, and strengthening local economies.

Jason Hartke, of the US Green Building Council, a partner to the RC4A campaign, states that preparing for a disaster is far cheaper than cleaning up after, so local governments can save both lives and money. “For every $1 spent on disaster preparedness, a community can save $4 in avoided costs.”

By. James Burgess of Oilprice.com



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