• 5 minutes Oil prices forecast
  • 8 minutes Nuclear Power Can Be Green – But At A Price
  • 11 minutes Projection Of Experts: Oil Prices Expected To Stay Anchored Around $65-70 Through 2023
  • 16 minutes Europe Slipping into Recession?
  • 2 hours *Happy Dance* ... U.S. Shale Oil Slowdown
  • 9 hours Socialists want to exorcise the O&G demon by 2030
  • 6 hours Emissions from wear of brakes and tyres likely to be higher in supposedly clean vehicles, experts warn
  • 7 hours UK, Stay in EU, Says Tusk
  • 1 day Germany: Russia Can Save INF If It Stops Violating The Treaty
  • 2 days Connection Between Climate Rules And German's No-Limit Autobahns? Strange, But It Exists
  • 2 days Conspiracy - Theory versus Reality
  • 8 hours How Is Greenland Dealing With Climate Change?
  • 2 days Chevron to Boost Spend on Quick-Return Projects
  • 1 day Maritime Act of 2020 and pending carbon tax effects
  • 2 days U.S. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Weighs Lifting Tariffs On China
  • 2 days Regular Gas dropped to $2.21 per gallon today
Alt Text

Israel Aims To Become An Energy Export Hub

A new sub-sea natural gas…

Alt Text

Nord Stream 2 Is Losing Support In Germany

Support from Germany for the…

Dave Forest

Dave Forest

Dave is Managing Geologist of the Pierce Points Daily E-Letter.

More Info

Trending Discussions

The Next Shale Gas Hotspot

Shale gas is going global. It's simply too groundbreaking a concept not to spread.

Shale is now the name of the gas game in North America. And Europe is starting to see its first significant shale gas wells drilled by majors like Exxon and Halliburton.

But shale is also starting to pop up in some under-the-radar places. Asia, for instance.

This week, Malaysian deepwater petroleum giant Petronas reported its first-ever quarterly results. In the fine-print, the company noted it will "continue as a global player but with a greater emphasis on domestic deepwater and unconventional plays to arrest domestic production declines."

Meaning, Petronas is looking toward shales and tight gas plays in its backyard.

This jives with reports I've been getting of late. The Malaysians have been flying in U.S. experts on shale gas to beef up their knowledge. (Ditto the Saudis, interestingly enough.)

Southeast Asia has a strong and growing gas market. And plenty of shale. Not a bad place to be for an unconventional gas player.

By. Dave Forest of Notela Resources




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News