• 50 mins Higher Oil Prices Reduce North American Oil Bankruptcies
  • 3 hours Statoil To Boost Exploration Drilling Offshore Norway In 2018
  • 4 hours $1.6 Billion Canadian-US Hydropower Project Approved
  • 6 hours Venezuela Officially In Default
  • 8 hours Iran Prepares To Export LNG To Boost Trade Relations
  • 10 hours Keystone Pipeline Leaks 5,000 Barrels Into Farmland
  • 16 hours Saudi Oil Minister: Markets Will Not Rebalance By March
  • 21 hours Obscure Dutch Firm Wins Venezuelan Oil Block As Debt Tensions Mount
  • 1 day Rosneft Announces Completion Of World’s Longest Well
  • 1 day Ecuador Won’t Ask Exemption From OPEC Oil Production Cuts
  • 1 day Norway’s $1 Trillion Wealth Fund Proposes To Ditch Oil Stocks
  • 1 day Ecuador Seeks To Clear Schlumberger Debt By End-November
  • 1 day Santos Admits It Rejected $7.2B Takeover Bid
  • 2 days U.S. Senate Panel Votes To Open Alaskan Refuge To Drilling
  • 2 days Africa’s Richest Woman Fired From Sonangol
  • 2 days Oil And Gas M&A Deal Appetite Highest Since 2013
  • 2 days Russian Hackers Target British Energy Industry
  • 2 days Venezuela Signs $3.15B Debt Restructuring Deal With Russia
  • 2 days DOJ: Protestors Interfering With Pipeline Construction Will Be Prosecuted
  • 2 days Lower Oil Prices Benefit European Refiners
  • 2 days World’s Biggest Private Equity Firm Raises $1 Billion To Invest In Oil
  • 3 days Oil Prices Tank After API Reports Strong Build In Crude Inventories
  • 3 days Iraq Oil Revenue Not Enough For Sustainable Development
  • 3 days Sudan In Talks With Foreign Oil Firms To Boost Crude Production
  • 3 days Shell: Four Oil Platforms Shut In Gulf Of Mexico After Fire
  • 3 days OPEC To Recruit New Members To Fight Market Imbalance
  • 3 days Green Groups Want Norway’s Arctic Oil Drilling Licenses Canceled
  • 4 days Venezuelan Oil Output Drops To Lowest In 28 Years
  • 4 days Shale Production Rises By 80,000 BPD In Latest EIA Forecasts
  • 4 days GE Considers Selling Baker Hughes Assets
  • 4 days Eni To Address Barents Sea Regulatory Breaches By Dec 11
  • 4 days Saudi Aramco To Invest $300 Billion In Upstream Projects
  • 4 days Aramco To List Shares In Hong Kong ‘For Sure’
  • 4 days BP CEO Sees Venezuela As Oil’s Wildcard
  • 4 days Iran Denies Involvement In Bahrain Oil Pipeline Blast
  • 7 days The Oil Rig Drilling 10 Miles Under The Sea
  • 7 days Baghdad Agrees To Ship Kirkuk Oil To Iran
  • 7 days Another Group Joins Niger Delta Avengers’ Ceasefire Boycott
  • 7 days Italy Looks To Phase Out Coal-Fired Electricity By 2025
  • 7 days Kenya Set To Give Local Communities Greater Share Of Oil Revenues
Climate Progress

Climate Progress

Joe Romm is a Fellow at American Progress and is the editor of Climate Progress, which New York Times columnist Tom Friedman called "the indispensable…

More Info

Scientists Studying the Link between Fracking and Recent Earthquakes in Texas

Scientists Studying the Link between Fracking and Recent Earthquakes in Texas

Scientists from two Texas universities are looking into a pair of recent earthquakes near the Texas-Louisiana border for clues to whether they were related to underground injection of oil and gas drilling waste produced in the course of hydraulic fracturing or fracking.

Fracking 1

One of the scientists studying the two recent Texas quakes was on a team that concluded a swarm of earthquakes near Dallas in 2008 and 2009 were related to the disposal of drilling wastes, according to E&E’s Energy Wire.

Cliff Frohlich, a research scientist at the University of Texas who studied those Dallas area quakes, did not rule out a similar conclusion in the recent east Texas quakes.

“It’s possible they were natural,” he said. “It’s possible they were man-made.”

The two quakes, a 3.9 magnitude event on May 10 and a 4.3 magnitude one on May 17, took place northeast of Nacogdoches, Texas. That area is part of the Haynesville shale formation and is home to injection wells.

The two recent events come about a month after the US. Geological Survey reported that a big increase in earthquakes across a large part of the nation’s midsection since 2001 is “almost certainly manmade.”  Though the agency did not tie the increase directly to a big increase in drilling for gas and oil from shale formations, it did say the surge in seismic activity “corresponds” to that development and the huge jump in fracking and the underground disposal of liquid wastes that flow back to the surface after fracking jobs are completed. Fracking involves the injection at high pressure of large quantities of water, sand and chemicals into underground rock formations to release oil and gas. Afterwards, much of that mixture, commonly called brine, is brought back to the surface and often disposed of by re-injecting it deep underground.

In March, Ohio oil and gas regulators linked a dozen earthquakes in the northeast part of the state to the disposal of drilling brine after hydraulic fracturing. At the same time, the state announced new regulations governing the transport and disposal of drilling wastes, including banning underground injections into a formation that contains a fault in the region.

By. Tom Kenworthy




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Mel Tisdale on May 24 2012 said:
    Silly question perhaps and only obscurely related to the article:

    Does the waste a.k.a. 'brine' exit at sufficiently high pressure and quantity to generate electricity cheaply enough to sell to the grid and thus recoup some of the costs of fracking?

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News