• 4 hours PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 6 hours Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 8 hours Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 9 hours Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 10 hours Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 11 hours Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 12 hours Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 14 hours New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 15 hours Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 17 hours Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 23 hours Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 1 day British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 1 day Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 1 day Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 1 day Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 1 day OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 2 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 2 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 2 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 2 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 2 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 3 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 3 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 3 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 3 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 3 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 3 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 4 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 4 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 4 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 4 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 4 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 4 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 4 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 5 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 5 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO

Natural Gas Now a Growing Alternative to Gasoline

Natural Gas Now a Growing Alternative to Gasoline

The Denver Post reported the opening on Saturday of stations offering compressed natural gas to drivers in Grand Junction and Rifle, towns along Interstate 70 in western Colorado, making it possible to drive a vehicle fueled by compressed natural gas from Denver to Los Angeles.

The Glenwood Springs Post Independent offered this account:

The use of CNG fuel on the Western Slope has long been stymied as a "chicken-and-egg" scenario. No one wanted to invest in CNG cars or trucks because there were no filling stations, but there were no filling stations because no one was driving CNG vehicles.

Kirk Swallow, owner of Swallow Oil and an investor in Rocky Mountain Alternative Fueling, has now changed that. Last year, Swallow won a $675,000 grant from the Governor's Energy Office to develop the Rifle station. He and his partners in Rocky Mountain Alternative Fueling covered the difference for the Rifle station, which cost about $900,000....

As part of the grant application, Swallow obtained commitments from local fleet operators to begin making vehicle conversions to CNG.

EnCana Oil & Gas (USA), Williams Production RMT and Bill Barrett Corp. all pledged to convert five to 10 vehicles a year to natural gas. Garfield County committed to converting a dozen vehicles. The city of Rifle and Colorado Mountain College are also running bi-fuel vehicles, which can run on CNG until that tank is empty, and the switch on the fly to burn gasoline.

Technological breakthroughs in drilling methods have turned natural gas into a resource that the United States has in abundance. But what is the appropriate role of government in promoting the transition to more use of this resource for transportation? The "chicken and egg" problem referred to in the Post Independent article is an example of what economists call a "network externality", for which it makes a lot of sense for the government to be a first mover in helping encourage the infrastructure necessary to enable market forces to take over.

The days when significant numbers of people drive from Denver to Los Angeles in a CNG-powered vehicle may still be a distant vision.

But I am glad that some people have that vision and are doing what they can to make it a reality.

By. James Hamilton

Reproduced from Econbrowser




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Anonymous on April 07 2011 said:
    A good way to introduce CNG into the transportation economy, would be for school districts to use CNG for school buses. And/or, for public transit systems to convert buses to CNG. Fueling stations for such vehicles could then be made available to whoever has a CNG-powered vehicle. Businesses could be encouraged, perhaps with tax rebates, to convert their vehicles to CNG operation and to make use of CNG facilities originally built for school, public transit, or government motor pool vehicles. This nucleus, once started, could then be expanded.
  • Anonymous on April 07 2011 said:
    As an added bonus, at the Rifle station you can choose between a Remington deer rifle, a high powered Zeiss hunting scope, or 500 rounds of Winchester rifle ammo, free with every CNG fill-up.It is all about matching sales incentives to location! :-*

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News