• 2 minutes Rational analysis of CV19 from Harvard Medical School
  • 4 minutes While U.S. Pipelines Are Under Siege, China Streamlines Its Oil and Gas Network
  • 7 minutes Renewables Overtake Coal, But Lag Far Behind Oil And Natural Gas
  • 12 hours Joe Biden the "Archie Bunker" of the left selects Kamala Harris for VP . . . . . . Does she help the campaign ?
  • 25 mins Tesla Begins Construction Of World’s Largest Energy Storage Facility
  • 19 hours Trump Hands Putin Major Geopolitical Victory
  • 5 hours America Could Go Fully Electric Right Now
  • 2 hours Will any journalist have the balls to ask Kamala if she supports Wall Street "Carried Interest" Tax Loophole
  • 14 hours Those Nasty White People and Camping Racism
  • 2 hours In 1,267 days, Trump has made 20,055 false or misleading claims
  • 9 hours COVID&life and Vicious Circle: "Working From Home Is Not Panacea For Virus"
  • 3 hours .
  • 1 hour Brent above $45. Holding breath for $50??
  • 4 hours Buying votes is cool now.
  • 15 hours The Truth about Chinese and Indian Engineering
  • 1 day Oil Tanker Runs Aground in Mauritius - Oil Spill
  • 2 days China wields coronavirus to nationalize American-owned carmaker
  • 2 days Open letter from Politico about US-russian relations
  • 2 hours The World is Facing a Solar Panel Waste Problem
Why Natural Gas Prices Just Exploded

Why Natural Gas Prices Just Exploded

Natural gas prices were soaring…

The Permian Could See Record Gas Production In 2021

The Permian Could See Record Gas Production In 2021

The Permian basin could return…

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel Graeber is a writer and political analyst based in Michigan. His work on matters related to the geopolitical aspects of the global energy sector,…

More Info

Premium Content

Colorado Enacts Tough New Fracking Measures

The state government in Colorado announced that it enacted some of the most stringent laws related to oil and natural gas operations in the country. New regulations require energy companies to conduct before-and-after samples of groundwater wells in the state to determine what impact, if any, exploration has on water quality. The rules follow a decision by the U.S. government to wait another 8 months before it closes the comment period for a study on the possible contamination of water supplies from fracking operations in Wyoming. While Colorado officials cloaked their statements in cautious language, the regulations suggest lawmakers are starting to catch up with the debate over the U.S. oil and natural boom

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation agency announced it crafted rules that require energy companies to sample as many as four water wells within a half mile of new oil and natural gas operations prior to drilling. After that, two more samples are required within a year and again within six years of drilling in order to determine what sort of impact oil and natural gas operations have on water supplies.

"This rule represents a strong, proactive step to monitor and protect our groundwater and is right for Colorado," said Commissioner Andy Spielman in a statement.

Related Article: What Stands in the Way of Natural Gas Replacing Gasoline in the US?

Colorado ranks among the top 10 states in the nation in terms of oil and natural gas production. The U.S. Energy Department states that parts of the Green River formation, the largest known oil shale deposit in the world with an estimated 1 trillion barrels of oil, are situated within the state. In terms of natural gas, the state ranks fifth in the country in terms of production, meaning it ranks above other shale-rich states like Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Shale oil and natural gas developments are emerging drivers behind a recovering U.S. economy. Amid the boom, however, comes growing concerns about the safety of working in shale plays like Green River. The U.S. government last week extended a comment period until Sept. 30 for a report on hydraulic fracturing operations in Wyoming. That report may be the first to show that the controversial practice may led to the contamination of water supplies. Environmental groups argue that fracking may eventually pollute groundwater with chemicals like benzene and glycols. Encana, an energy company included in the study for Pavillian, Wyo., however, said the government's probe was a waste of time.

Related Article: The Real Reason the Natural Gas Industry Hates Matt Damon's New Movie

Advocates of oil and natural gas operations in the United States contend there are no proven instances where fracking was tied directly to the contamination of drinking water. The Pavillion study, they say, used "faulty data" and included "heavily contested conclusions." Colorado regulators, for their part, said the new state regulations are meant to allay concerns about energy development "in the very rare instances of impact."

Only two states in the nation have groundwater programs in place like Colorado's and the state is the first to require post-drilling water samples. Regulators said the new measure will help state officials determine what factors of oil and gas operations, if any, are affecting groundwater. Despite the controversy over shale development, state leaders have decided it’s time to face the issue directly.

"We have once again set the bar high in our assertive and judicious regulatory approach to oil and gas development," said Spielman.

By. Daniel J. Graeber of Oilprice.com


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage





Leave a comment
  • dennis hibbert on January 15 2013 said:
    The Green River formation is not involved in oil production--it contains no oil. Kerogen is an oil precursor and that is what the Green River holds. What is called shale oil (Bakken, Eagle Ford) is found in fractured reservoir rock with oil in the fractures and is a different beast altogether. Fracking and horizontal drilling can recover oil from such, though it isn't cheap.

    Shell has been sitting on a lease in the Green River formation for more than 30 years and has produced not a drop of oil, as it would take a great deal of water and energy to do so and both are in sort supply out there. Chevron gave back its leases early last year. Exxon walked away in 1982.
  • rebecca on January 18 2013 said:
    We can and do have other ways to power cars, make electricity and heat homes.

    There is no substitute for water to drink and grow food. Life itself (yours and mine and theirs) depends on it.

    How about putting that money into building a solar panel, wind, hydro technology. Be a hero not a selfish villan.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News