• 3 minutes Nucelar Deal Is Dead? Iran Distances Itself Further From ND, Alarming Russia And France
  • 5 minutes Don Jr. Tweets name Ukraine Whistleblower, Eric Ciaramella. Worked for CIA during Obama Administration, Hold over to Trump National Security Counsel under Gen McCallister, more . . . .
  • 9 minutes Shale pioneer Chesepeak will file bankruptcy soon. FINALLY ! The consolidation begins
  • 12 minutes China's Blueprint For Global Power
  • 3 hours EU has already lost the Trump vs. EU Trade War
  • 2 days Science: Only correct if it fits the popular narrative
  • 12 mins Impeachment S**te
  • 2 days Crazy Stories From Round The World
  • 5 hours Pope Proposes New Sin: Thou Shalt Not Destroy The Harmony Of The Environment
  • 10 hours Everything You Need To Know About Trump
  • 2 hours 55.00 WTI
  • 2 hours Visualizing Pennsylvania Oil & Gas Production (Through September 2019)
  • 1 day IEA predicts oil demand will grow annually at 1 million barrels a day for the next 5 years
  • 4 hours Water, Trump, and Israel’s National Security
  • 2 days Iran Burning: Shock Gas Price Hike Triggers Violent Protests After Subsidy Cuts
  • 2 days Atty General Barr likely subpeona so called whistleblower and "leaker" Eric Ciaramella
  • 1 day ‘If it saves a life’: Power cut to 1.5 million Californians
  • 10 hours Last I Checked
Alt Text

Are Asian LNG Prices About To Rally?

LNG spot prices rose last…

Alt Text

The Easy Money In European Natural Gas Is Gone

Traders are unable to take…

Alt Text

Extreme Volatility In U.S. Natural Gas Market Is Here To Stay

Despite some bearish forecasts, natural…

Dave Forest

Dave Forest

Dave is Managing Geologist of the Pierce Points Daily E-Letter.

More Info

Premium Content

Gazprom Finally Accepts that Shale Gas Has Changed the World

The Russian gas giant this week said it will allow up to 15% of its gas sales to Europe to be sold at spot gas prices on the continent.

This is a big shift for Gazprom. Previously, the major insisted on selling gas to European users under long-term contracts. With gas prices linked to prevailing oil prices.

It's long been usual practice in Europe to sell gas using an oil-linked price structure. Decades ago, when gas was just coming into widespread use, players in the industry decided that the fuel should be priced according to value of the other fuels it was displacing. If users were switching from oil to gas, the gas should cost roughly as much as the unused oil, on an energy-content basis.

This cost structure prevailed in Europe for a long time. But shale gas seems to have cut the legs out from under oily gas prices.

With America now producing above and beyond expectations thanks to shale gas development, gas exporters globally are scrambling to find markets. The world built liquefied natural gas plants thinking the U.S. would be the "market of last resort".

But America is awash in its own production, and the high American prices that exporters were hoping for have vanished. Meaning that today there is a fleet of LNG ships looking for a home for their product.

This flood of global gas supply has depressed spot gas prices globally. To the point where the traditional 6 to 1 oil to gas price ratio has become more like 15 to 1. Gas is very cheap compared to crude.

The result being that European gas users would rather buy cheap LNG than pay high rates for oil-linked gas piped in by Gazprom.

Gazprom resisted re-pricing its gas for some time. But this week's announcement suggests the company has finally capitulated. They are willing to sell some of their gas at lower, spot prices. Otherwise they will be largely priced out of the European market.

The interesting thing will be the knock-on effects of Gazprom's decision. Suddenly, a lot of Russian gas is price-competitive with LNG. Meaning that fewer LNG shipments will be ordered to the continent.

The question is: where will these boats go? They may end up headed back to America. Asian gas buyers are busy sewing up contracts with new LNG developments in Australia. If Europe and Asia are out, the U.S. is the only game in town.

A spate of new LNG landings in the U.S. would have a downward effect on North American gas prices. At a time when prices in many parts of America are already falling below $5 per mcf. Just this week, gas major EnCana said it expects North American prices to remain in the $6 range for the foreseeable future.

This is progress. The gas industry did a great job over the last several years of developing new supply globally. Now we just have to find a place to put it all.

By. Dave Forest of Notela Resources




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage



Leave a comment
  • Anonymous on March 05 2010 said:
    Changed the world. I sent a short article to someone yesterday with just that possibility in mind. If shale does 'change the world'. it will mean a GASPEC by the end of this year. As for Russia being priced out of the European market, that kind of thinking belongs in a movie magazine.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News
Download on the App Store Get it on Google Play