• 4 minutes End of Sanction Waivers
  • 8 minutes Balancing Act---Sanctions, Venezuela, Trade War and Demand
  • 11 minutes Mueller Report Brings Into Focus Obama's Attempted Coup Against Trump
  • 14 minutes What Would Happen If the World Ran Out of Crude Oil?
  • 13 mins ..
  • 1 min Summit: Kim, Putin To Meet Thursday in Russia’s Far East
  • 16 mins New German Study Shocks Electric Cars: “Considerably” Worse For Climate Than Diesel Cars, Up To 25% More CO2
  • 8 hours Don't Climb Onto the $80+ Oil Price Greed Roller Coaster, Please.
  • 10 hours Deep Analysis: How China Is Replacing America As Asia’s Military Titan
  • 1 hour Iran Sabre Rattles Over the Straights of Hormuz
  • 23 hours Saudi Arabia Says To Coordinate With Other Producers To Ensure Adequate Oil Supply
  • 16 hours Populist Surge Coming in Europe's May Election
  • 20 hours Liberal Heads Explode as U.S. Senate Confirms Oil Lobbyist David Bernhardt as Interior Secretary
  • 15 hours China To Promote Using Wind Energy To Power Heating
  • 2 hours "Undeniable" Shale Slowdown?
  • 2 hours How many drilling sites are left in the Permian?
Alt Text

New Electric Vehicles Contain Much More Lithium

Lithium carbonate equivalent deployed worldwide…

Alt Text

Oil Climbs Higher As U.S. Looks To End Iran Sanction Waivers

The U.S. administration is preparing…

Matt Smith

Matt Smith

Taking a voyage across the world of energy with ClipperData’s Director of Commodity Research. Follow on Twitter @ClipperData, @mattvsmith01

More Info

Trending Discussions

U.S. Gulf Coast Refiners Are Bouncing Back

Nearly twenty days (or over 450 hours) after Hurricane Harvey made landfall between Port Aransas and Port O'Connor in Texas, there are a number of signs emerging in our ClipperData that the refinery hub of the U.S. is returning to some semblance of normalcy. Hark, here are but three such examples:

Crude waiting offshore is gradually dropping after peaking at the beginning of the week at 31 million barrels - the highest since January. At the start of the week, we saw nearly 50 dirty tankers in the U.S. Gulf, as a backlog built up, ready to deliver to Texas ports as refineries restart.

(Click to enlarge)

Waterborne crude imports into the U.S. Gulf Coast have averaged 3 million barrels per day for 2017, until recent weeks. Arrivals dropped to close to 1mn bpd in the trading week immediately after Hurricane Harvey's landfall, before rebounding back above 2mn bpd last week. Although flows to Texas ports were halted amid the hurricane, we saw higher volumes heading to Louisiana ports instead. Imports are now resuming to key Texas ports.

(Click to enlarge) Related: WTI Breaks $50 As Bullish Sentiment Builds

While crude imports rebound, we see a similar trend playing out for product exports. After they dropped precipitously amid Hurricane Harvey, we are seeing them rebounding across the board - from LPG to fuel oil, to gasoline and diesel. Nonetheless, just as with crude imports, product exports are yet to return to their former glory, with so much refinery capacity still offline.

(Click to enlarge)

By Matt Smith

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News