• 6 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 11 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 17 minutes Why hydrogen economics is does not work
  • 38 mins The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 6 hours Starvation, horror in Venezuela
  • 2 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 5 hours Crude Price going to $62.50
  • 21 hours Anyone Worried About the Lira Dragging EVERYTHING Else Down?
  • 1 hour WSJ *still* refuses to acknowledge U.S. Shale Oil industry's horrible economics and debts
  • 14 hours Chinese EV Startup Nio Files for $1.8 billion IPO
  • 1 day Oil prices---Tug of War: Sanctions vs. Trade War
  • 1 day Russia retaliate: Our Response to U.S. Sanctions Will Be Precise And Painful
  • 1 day Correlation does not equal causation, but they do tend to tango on occasion
  • 1 day Monsanto hit by $289 Million for cancerous weedkiller
  • 17 hours < sigh > $90 Oil Is A Very Real Possibility
  • 34 mins Saudi Arabia Cuts Diplomatic Ties with Canada
Alt Text

Oil Claws Back Some Of This Week’s Losses

OPEC production has spiked, with…

Alt Text

The Oil Bulls Are Back

Oil markets had a bullish…

Al Fin

Al Fin

Al Fin runs a number of very successful blogs that cover, energy, technology, news and politics.

More Info

Trending Discussions

Turning Old Carpets Into Oil: Garbage to Energy

Four billion pounds of carpet enter waste streams in the U.S. each year, says CEO Ron Simonetti. Five pounds of oil go into a single pound of nylon, so annually the U.S. could curb oil exports by millions of barrels via recycling. _GTM

Carpets to oil
GreenTechMedia

US companies are scrambling to find economical ways to use garbage and waste profitably. From municipal solid waste to sewage to discarded tyres and carpets to farm and forest waste, the US is endowed with plentiful waste materials. The key is devising economical processes to convert and recycle the waste to valuable products.

The key to MCR’s technology is a precipitation/distillation process it calls DynaSep. First, carpet goes to a recycler where it gets shaved. The backing, made of calcium carbonate, goes to one company and MCR takes the fibers.

MCR dissolves the fiber in formic acid to make a nylon soup. Then comes the secret precipitation process. The process occurs at room temperature, but at an elevated pressure. In the end, the process fleeces out the dirt so that the company is left with 99 percent pure nylon and a reusable tub of formic acid. _GTM

By. Al Fin




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News