• 2 hours PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 4 hours Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 6 hours Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 7 hours Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 8 hours Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 9 hours Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 10 hours Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 12 hours New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 13 hours Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 15 hours Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 21 hours Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 1 day British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 1 day Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 1 day Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 1 day Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 1 day OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 1 day London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 1 day Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 2 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 2 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 2 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 2 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 2 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 3 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 3 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 3 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 3 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 3 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 3 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 3 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 3 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 4 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 4 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 4 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 4 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 4 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 4 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 4 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 5 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 5 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
Alt Text

India’s Urban Explosion Boosts Oil Demand

As India sees incredible growth…

Alt Text

Why U.S. Crude Exports Are Booming

U.S. crude oil exports are…

Alt Text

What’s Stopping An Oil Price Rally?

Oil prices rallied in Q3…

Survey Shows Fracking Communities Suffer from Stress Due to Fear of Exploitation

Survey Shows Fracking Communities Suffer from Stress Due to Fear of Exploitation

In a new survey, 76 percent of people living near fracking sites in Pennsylvania reported stress, which they attributed to lack of trust and feeling taken advantage of.

Survey respondents attribute several dozen health concerns and stressors to the Marcellus Shale developments in their area, according to a long-term analysis by University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health researchers.

Reported health impacts persist and increase over time, even after the initial drilling activity subsides, they note. The study, which will be published in the May issue of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, did not include clinical examinations of the participants’ physical health or any environmental tests.

Researchers surveyed those who believe their health has been affected by hydraulic fracturing activities for self-reported symptoms and stressors. The most commonly cited concern was stress.

Related article: SOUTH AFRICA: Shale Gas Permits Remain Elusive

Among the leading causes of stress reported by the participants were feelings of being taken advantage of, having their concerns and complaints ignored, and being denied information or misled.

“Many of these stressors can be addressed immediately by the gas drilling industry and by government,” says senior author Bernard Goldstein, emeritus professor and former dean of University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

“Scientific literature shows that if people do not trust companies doing work in their communities, or believe that the government is misleading them, there is a heightened perception of risk,” says Goldstein, also a member of the National Academies’ committees to investigate shale gas drilling in the US and Canada.

“Community disruption and psychosocial stress have been well-documented as a result of environmental issues like oil spills and superfund sites. A strong response by the Pennsylvania Department of Health to address concerns about health impacts of hydrofracturing could reduce observed stress and resulting symptoms.”

From May through October 2010, members of Pitt Public Health’s Center for Healthy Environments and Communities conducted in-depth interviews with 33 people concerned about fracking in their communities. Three-quarters of the residents resided in five of the seven most heavily drilled counties in Pennsylvania.

Related article: US: Fracking Regulations for Federal Lands?

Follow-up interviews were conducted from January through April 2012 and included 20 of the initial 33 participants. The remainder could not be reached or declined to participate.

“Our study shows that perceptions of health may be affected by fracking regardless of whether this health impact is due to direct exposure to chemical and physical agents resulting from drilling or to the psychosocial stressors of living near drilling activity,” says lead author and doctoral student Kyle Ferrar.

“Comprehensive epidemiological studies of all potential adverse consequences of fracking need to be performed, and they should include a close look at psychosocial symptoms, including stress, which cause very real health complications.”

Participants reported 59 unique health issues that they attributed to Marcellus Shale development. In addition to stress, these perceived health issues included rashes, headaches, shortness of breath, nausea, and sore throats.

By. Allison Hydzik




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Steve Rupert on May 01 2013 said:
    I cannot believe that anyone take this obviously flawed study seriously. Where to start?
    1) "76 percent of people living near fracking sites in Pennsylvania reported stress" The authors of the study reported interviewing 33 people. So that means that out of over 6,200 Marcellus Shale wells that have been drilled in PA, there are only 44 people living nearby? (44 x 76% = 33) That seems pretty unlikely to me.
    2) "From May through October 2010, members of Pitt Public Health’s Center for Healthy Environments and Communities conducted in-depth interviews with 33 people concerned about fracking in their communities." Really? Would you expect people who were opposed to drilling to NOT report some adverse effects?
    3) "The study, which will be published in the May issue of the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, did not include clinical examinations of the participants’ physical health or any environmental tests." Just how can you do an actual health study without ANY physical or environmental tests?
    4) MOST TELLING OF ALL. "Follow-up interviews were conducted from January through April 2012 and included 20 of the initial 33 participants. The remainder could not be reached or declined to participate." So even if we accepted the miniscule sample as valid, the researchers were only able to follow up with just 60% of those, which totally invalidates any conclusions based upon the follow-up study.

    THIS IS HORRIBLE SCIENCE. I AM ASHAMED OF PITT FOR EVEN PROMOTING IT AS A VALID STUDY!

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News