• 1 min British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 4 hours Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 6 hours Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 7 hours Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 8 hours OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 9 hours London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 10 hours Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 13 hours Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 19 hours India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 1 day Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 1 day Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 1 day Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 1 day Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 2 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 2 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 2 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 2 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 2 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 2 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 2 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 2 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 2 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 3 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 3 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 3 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 3 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 3 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 3 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 4 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
  • 6 days Trump Passes Iran Nuclear Deal Back to Congress
  • 6 days Texas Shutters More Coal-Fired Plants
  • 6 days Oil Trading Firm Expects Unprecedented U.S. Crude Exports
  • 6 days UK’s FCA Met With Aramco Prior To Proposing Listing Rule Change
  • 7 days Chevron Quits Australian Deepwater Oil Exploration
  • 7 days Europe Braces For End Of Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 7 days Renewable Energy Startup Powering Native American Protest Camp
  • 7 days Husky Energy Set To Restart Pipeline
  • 7 days Russia, Morocco Sign String Of Energy And Military Deals
  • 7 days Norway Looks To Cut Some Of Its Generous Tax Breaks For EVs
  • 7 days China Set To Continue Crude Oil Buying Spree, IEA Says
Alt Text

This Key Data Points At Strong U.S. Oil Demand

U.S. Gasoline prices haven’t risen…

Alt Text

The U.S. Shale Play To Watch In 2018

The original U.S. shale gas…

Alt Text

Is OPEC Considering Deeper Output Cuts?

You could argue OPEC and…

Mapping Mangroves for Our Carbon Future

Mapping Mangroves for Our Carbon Future

A new study of 35 countries maps out the amount of carbon stored by mangrove ecosystems in various parts of the world in hopes of learning from the mangrove’s elusive carbon-storing system courtesy of Mother Nature.

Mapping these mangrove hotspots is critical to our energy future, scientists say, because understanding how they store carbon could unlock future energy secrets, while safeguarding these gems will be of vast importance.

The new model used by the researchers enabled them to map the variations among the world’s mangrove forests and pinpoint those areas with the most carbon.

All mangroves are important for storing carbon, but some that ranked particularly high in the study include forests in Sumatra, Borneo and New Guinea, on the Pacific coast of Colombia, and in Northern Ecuador.

Related article: Coal’s Dirty Little Takeover Secret

Co-author of the study, Mark Spalding, senior marine scientist at The Nature Conservancy, opines that we need to think long and hard about preserving this natural carbon sequestration and all the other benefits mangroves offer.

“On average, mangroves have double the living biomass of tropical forests overall. This means that if you want to slow carbon emissions, one of the first places you could look would be in the mangroves. Stop an acre of loss here, and you will achieve a much bigger win than in many other areas,” Spalding wrote.

All plants capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it in their leaves, roots, trunks  and surrounding soil. But the mangrove takes this a step further. Unlike most other forests, mangrove soils do not have a maximum storage capacity, but keep on storing carbon in the soil, for centuries or even millennia. The result is that mangroves actively contribute to mitigating climate change by continuously removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

Related article: Exploring the Real Reasons Behind the Current Economic and Energy Crisis

The researchers’ model indicates that mangroves contain 1.6% of the total tropical forest biomass, even though they occupy only 0.6% of the total tropical forest area.

When mangrove forests are cut down for timber, or converted to agriculture or to aquaculture ponds, almost all their carbon is released into the atmosphere. Their very high biomass means that clearing even small tracts of mangrove generates high volumes of CO2.

So the mangrove has the ability to be either a creator or a destroyer, depending on whether mangrove forests are destroyed or preserved, with its secrets put research and development use.

By. Charles Kennedy of Oilprice.com




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • bmz on October 23 2013 said:
    "When mangrove forests are cut down for timber, or converted to agriculture or to aquaculture ponds, almost all their carbon is released into the atmosphere."
    You missed the millions of acres of mangroves cleared in south Florida for resorts and residences.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News