• 2 minutes Oil Price Could Fall To $30 If Global Deal Not Extended
  • 5 minutes Middle East on brink: Oil tankers attacked off Oman
  • 8 minutes CNN:America's oil boom will break more records this year. OPEC is stuck in retreat
  • 7 hours Here We Go: New York Lawmakers Pass Aggressive Law To Fight Climate Change
  • 2 hours The Inconvenient Truth Of Electric Cars
  • 5 hours Iran downs US drone. No military response . . Just Completely Destroy their Economy. Can Senator Kerry be tried for aiding enemy ?
  • 1 hour Oil Demand Needs to Halve: Equinor
  • 7 hours Magic of Shale: EXPORTS!! Crude Exporters Navigate Gulf Coast Terminal Constraints
  • 9 hours Ireland To Ban New Petrol And Diesel Vehicles From 2030
  • 4 hours Solar Panels at 26 cents per watt
  • 9 hours Is $60/Bbl WTI still considered a break even for Shale Oil
  • 2 hours The Plastics Problem
  • 10 hours Wonders of Shale - Gas, bringing investments and jobs to the US
  • 10 hours NATO Article 5: Attack on one member is attack on all. Members all must come to defense . . . NOT facilitate financial transactions to circumvent and foil US Sanctions. Somebody please tell Angela.
  • 5 hours Section 232 Uranium
  • 3 hours Green vs. Coal: Bavaria Seeks Fast-Track German Coal Exit in Snub to Merkel Plan
  • 3 hours Huge UK Gas Discovery
  • 6 hours Hydrogen FTW... Some Day
Alt Text

Two Events That Will Determine Oil Prices

The next couple of weeks,…

Alt Text

Philadelphia Refinery Explosion To Boost Gasoline Prices

The explosions at the Philadelphia…

Alt Text

OPEC Agrees To Schedule Meeting On July 1-2

After weeks of disagreements, conflicting…

RFE/RL staff

RFE/RL staff

RFE/RL journalists report the news in 21 countries where a free press is banned by the government or not fully established. We provide what many…

More Info

Trending Discussions

Could Russian Hackers Cause Power Outages In The U.S.?

Hackers believed to be allied with the Russian government have devised a cyberweapon that has the potential to be highly disruptive against the world's electrical systems, researchers have reported.

The malware, which researchers have dubbed CrashOverride or Industroyer, is known to have disrupted the electrical system in Ukraine in December, briefly shutting down one-fifth of Kyiv's electric power.

Dragos, one of the cybersecurity firms that identified the malware in a report on June 12, said Russian government hackers had shown an interest in targeting power grids in other countries as well, including the United States.

The malware is capable of attacking power systems across Europe and Asia, and "with small modifications" could be used in the United States to cause outages of up to a few days in portions of the grid, Dragos said.

With modifications, the malware could also attack other types of critical infrastructure, including local transportation providers, water systems, and natural gas suppliers, Dragos said.

News of the discovery prompted the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to advise all critical infrastructure operators to make sure they were following recommended security practices on June 12.

Dragos named the group that created the new malware Electrum, and said it had high confidence that Electrum used the same computer systems as the hackers who attacked Ukraine's electrical grid in the earliest known incident in December 2015.

The 2015 attack, which left 225,000 customers without power, was carried out by Russian government hackers, U.S. researchers have concluded, and was linked to a group called Sandworm, which is believed to be associated with the Russian government.

Related: Is Canada’s Oil Production Ready For A Resurgence?

Dragos said Sandworm and Electrum might be the same group, or two separate groups working within the same organization, but the forensic evidence shows they are related.

The malware samples from the 2016 attack in Ukraine were first obtained by ESET, a Slovakian research firm, which shared some of them with Dragos. ESET has dubbed the malware Industroyer, while Dragos calls it CrashOverride.

Industroyer or CrashOverride was specifically tailored to disrupt or destroy industrial-control systems, and represents the most powerful threat since Stuxnet, a worm created by the United States and Israel to disrupt Iran’s nuclear capability.

By RFE/RL

More Top Reads From Oilprice.com:




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Bill Simpson on June 13 2017 said:
    We need a new system, the Powernet. I envision a system of wires and fiber optic cables connecting the power plants, which would be impossible to connect to the Internet. You would need specialists over here to physically tap into the system in order to disrupt our grid. That would take a huge effort. And I bet scientists could figure out a way to detect any unauthorized intrusions into it. The only access terminals would be inside the control rooms of the power plants and dams. The control terminals would be custom designed, and produced by a special government plant. Unauthorized use of the terminal would be considered terrorism, punishable by death. They would be under 24 hour video camera surveillance, with recordings saved for at least 10 years. Sabotage the grid, and you die, should be the law.
    The utility companies have all the rights of way already in place. You could build three separate systems, in case one, or two, got damaged. Bury them 3 feet underground, inside schedule 80 PVC pipe. You won't cut that without using a backhoe, or drill attachment on a tractor. A foot of concrete poured over it would make accidentally cutting it a very rare event. It would last thousands of years down there. And the construction would employ thousands of people and take a long time. But it would be well worth it. If we can build 45,000 miles of Interstate Highways, we can build the Powernet. And unlike roads, once built, Powernet will require little maintenance.
    I would keep any needed command and control centers well inland, so that in the event of a surprise nuclear attack, they could function as long as possible. You could put them inside mountains, so that only a major nuclear power like Russia or China would have missile guidance systems accurate enough to destroy them with a nuclear near miss. The Russians and Chinese are unlikely to attack, since they know our submarines would vaporize them inside nuclear fireballs an hour later. Lesser powers, like North Korea, might try an attack as they are going down in a conventional war. And spending a few billion extra to drill into mountains will put more people to work. It wouldn't be as expensive as something like NORAD, or what Putin and Xi have.
    I don't care if it adds a couple of dollars a month to my electric bill. It would be the best investment the US government ever made, because eventually, hackers from somewhere will find a way to shut the grid down. That will kill many millions. The clock is ticking.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News