• 3 minutes Natural gas is crushing wind and solar power
  • 6 minutes OPEC and Russia could discuss emergency cuts
  • 8 minutes Is Pete Buttigieg emerging as the most likely challenger to Trump?
  • 11 minutes Question: Why are oil futures so low through 2020?
  • 13 minutes Don't sneeze. Coronavirus is a threat to oil markets and global economies
  • 31 mins Oil and gas producers fire back at Democratic presidential candidates.
  • 7 mins "Criticism of migration will become a criminal offense.  And media outlets that give room to criticism of migration, can be shut down." - EU Official to the Media.
  • 56 mins Saudi Aramco launches largest shale gas development outside U.S.
  • 6 hours So the west is winning, is it? Only if you’re a delusional Trump toady, Mr Pompeo, by Simon Tisdall
  • 12 hours Peak Shale Will Send Oil Prices Sky High
  • 4 hours Charts of COVID-19 Fatality Rate by Age and Sex
  • 7 hours CDC covid19 coverup?
  • 10 hours What Is Holding Back Geothermal Heating and Cooling?
  • 21 hours Fight with American ignorance, Part 1: US is a Republic, it is not a Democracy
Alt Text

Can Argentina Revitalize Its Oil Industry?

Argentina’s new government has taken…

Alt Text

Chevron Ramps Up Oil Production In Venezuela

Chevron has boosted oil production…

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel J. Graeber

Daniel Graeber is a writer and political analyst based in Michigan. His work on matters related to the geopolitical aspects of the global energy sector,…

More Info

Premium Content

Sudan's Oil War: Deadlines Before Development

Since gaining independence in July, Middle East and North African experts have expressed concerns that border conflicts and disputes over the sharing of oil revenue could threaten a very fragile peace deal between the two Sudanese governments. South Sudan last week said it wasn't going to produce any more oil because the government in the north was suspected of pilfering. Talks ended Friday without an agreement between two Sudanese governments that accuse one another of stoking ethnic conflict in the border regions. A comprehensive peace agreement reached in 2005 gave South Sudan the right to break away from the north, though fragility since July raises suspicions that geopolitical architects are placing deadlines before development.

The comprehensive peace deal was reached with Washington's help in 2005. It ended one of the bloodiest civil wars in human history, though roughly seven years later, problems remain in the troubled Sudanese region.  U.N. peace makers have sounded the famine alarm and ethnic conflict continues to take the lives of countless civilians.  Princeton Lyman, the U.S. special envoy for Sudan, told reporters this week he was "very concerned" about the humanitarian situation in the region.

South Sudan gets almost all of its revenue from oil. The country, when it broke away from the north, gained control of around 70 percent of the oil reserves in the region, though a landlocked South Sudan now depends on export routes through Sudan. South Sudan said it was talking with its neighbors about building a new oil pipeline to the east, though it's unlikely that would come online anytime soon. Meanwhile, African leaders have been unable to broker an agreement on oil between the two rival governments, taking bilateral ties between the two Sudans down to new post-independence lows.

In Iraq, the latest example of U.S. efforts to reshape a region, the government still lacks some of the legal mechanisms needed to govern the country's energy sector effectively after more than 8 years of war. That's not meant as direct criticism of U.S. endeavors in the Middle East and North Africa, but it warrants mention that oil was an underlying, and unresolved, security issue when South Sudan gained independence in July.

Lyman, during his press conference earlier this week, acknowledged that some of the outstanding issues in the region were "set aside" during the campaign for independence but were now "coming to the surface."  Would a delay in holding last year's referendum have resolved anything? Who knows, but both sides to the conflict are now, once again, warning of war.

By. Daniel J. Graeber of Oilprice.com




Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage




Leave a comment
  • Fred Banks on January 29 2012 said:
    Interesting. I taught at a UN establishment in Dakar a few centuries ago, and a couple of my students were from the Sudan. Very intelligent and very conscientious students, as were all except a couple of my students.

    But the people running that institute were ignorant, and instead of concentrating on expanding it and providing the best possible training, they concentrated on their careers and ideologies. That was the story at that institute, and probably all over that part of the world, and so when the oil is consumed or nearly consumed, you are going to see something like the present war multiplied by ten.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News