• 6 minutes Saudis Threaten Retaliation If Sanctions are Imposed
  • 11 minutes Can the World Survive without Saudi Oil?
  • 15 minutes Saudis Pull Hyperloop Funding As Branson Temporarily Cuts Ties With The Kingdom
  • 5 hours WTI @ $75.75, headed for $64 - 67
  • 9 hours Saudi-Kuwaiti Talks on Shared Oil Stall Over Chevron
  • 25 mins The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars
  • 3 hours Uber IPO Proposals Value Company at $120 Billion
  • 1 min Trump vs. MbS
  • 14 hours OPEC's No. 2 Producer Wants to Know How Buyers Use Its Oil
  • 1 hour Closing the circle around Saudi Arabia: Where did Khashoggi disappear?
  • 9 hours UN Report Suggests USD $240 Per Gallon Gasoline Tax to Fight Global Warming
  • 3 hours U.N. About Climate Change: World Must Take 'Unprecedented' Steps To Avert Worst Effects
  • 7 hours COLORADO FOCUS: Stocks to Watch Prior to Midterms
  • 13 hours China Thirsty for Canadian Crude
  • 6 hours Nopec Sherman act legislation
  • 9 hours EU to Splash Billions on Battery Factories
Alt Text

IEA: Renewables Set For Explosive Growth

The IEA sees strong growth…

Alt Text

The Overlooked Giant In Renewables

The IEA expects renewable energy…

Alt Text

New Breakthrough Could Slash Solar Prices To New Lows

Scientists believe they’ve found a…

Gloria Gonzalez

Gloria Gonzalez

Gloria is a writer for Environmental Finance.Environmental Finance is the leading global publication covering the ever-increasing impact of environmental issues on the lending, insurance, investment…

More Info

Trending Discussions

US Renewables Financing Set to Collapse Without Grant Extension

Renewable energy financing will decline precipitously next year if the US Congress fails to extend the cash grant programme, financing experts have warned.

Combining funds from the Section 1603 Treasury grant programme and available tax equity, the renewable energy sector will likely receive $6.7 billion in financing in 2010, surpassing the recent peak of $6.1 billion in 2007, which was all tax equity, according to a new study by the US Partnership for Renewable Energy Finance, a non-profit coalition of renewable financing experts.

But that financing will decline between 50% and 80% if the 1603 programme is allowed to expire at the end of 2010, according to the report, which surveyed all tax equity participants in the sector.

“The 1603 grant is the most urgent issue," said Michael Eckhart, president of the American Council on Renewable Energy in Washington, DC.

Although numerous provisions of the energy and climate bills being debated in Congress are critical for the long-term success of the industry, none of them would prevent the near collapse of the sector in the next two years if the programme is not extended, said Neil Auerbach, co-managing partner at private equity firm Hudson Clean Energy Partners in Teaneck, New Jersey.

“The Treasury grant programme is a cornerstone of renewable energy finance,” he said. “If you remove the cornerstone, the edifice weakens and it’s in danger of collapse.”

In 2007, 20 tax equity investors provided $6.1 billion to the renewable energy sector, but investment fell sharply to $3.4 billion in 2008 when 10 investors dropped out of the market due to insufficient taxable income or bankruptcy.

Fortunately for the renewable energy sector, the cash grant programme filled some of that financing void. In 2009, tax equity and the grant programme combined to provide $3.2 billion in financing, with the cash grant accounting for 61% of the equity capital market, according to the study.

Cash grants will comprise 55% of the $6.7 billion in tax equity and cash grant financing the renewables sector is expected to receive in 2010, according to the survey. But if the Treasury programme expires, financing will likely fall to $2.95 billion in 2011 and could even decline to $1.2 billion if the economy or credit markets revert to 2009 levels, the study found.

“If it expires, it will have very dire consequences on investment in this field,” Eckhart said.

There are currently 16 tax equity investors active in renewable energy, but as many as five of them will leave the market if the grant programme expires at the end of the year.

By. Gloria Gonzalez

Source: Environmental-Finance


x


Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment
  • Anonymous on July 27 2010 said:
    so? if a company\industry can't compete in a free, open marketplace then it doesn't have anything consumers want at a price they want to pay. the days of the government deciding who the winners in the marketplace are NEED to end. if taxpayers want to support a company let them buy stock
  • Anonymous on July 29 2010 said:
    I think you're grossly confusing free market economics with a sustainable energy policy. If the US does not develop an alternative to its current energy policy it will collapse. This technology needs to be developed ASAP just to offset the decline in oil production ahead. If you wait until the market wants to start developing it, you've waited too long. Yes there should be competing technology but in a field where there is little to no market, the government has to develop its own technology
  • Anonymous on August 28 2010 said:
    Ontoiran do not generalize the energy market. The conventional energy market (oil, gas, etc.) is the most highly subsidized industry in the world! The subsidies offered to them far outweigh anything the government offers to the renewable energy sector. I agree with your logic just implement it in all energy markets and see which ends up being the better and cheaper product.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News