• 3 minutes Looming European Gas Crisis in Winter and North African Factor - a must read by Cyril Widdershoven
  • 7 minutes "Biden Targets Another US Pipeline For Shutdown After 'Begging' Saudis For More Oil" - Zero Hedge Monday Nov 8th
  • 12 minutes "UN-Backed Banker Alliance Announces “Green” Plan to Transform the Global Financial System" by Whitney Webb
  • 9 mins GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES
  • 2 days China's aggression is changing the nature of sovereignty.
  • 4 days Building A $2 Billion Subsea Solar Power Cable From Chile To China
  • 1 day Ukrainian Maidan after 8 years
  • 3 days OPEC+ Expects Large Oil Glut In Early 2022
  • 2 days Delta variant in European Union
  • 2 days Hunter Biden Helped China Gain Control of Cobalt Mines in Africa
  • 10 hours Communist China Declared War on the US Long Ago Part 1 of the 2-part series: The CCP's War on America
  • 3 days Forecasts for Natural Gas
  • 3 days Microbes can provide sustainable hydrocarbons for the petrochemical industry
  • 2 hours President Biden’s Nuclear Option Against OPEC+ - Waste of Time
  • 14 hours Сryptocurrency predictions
  • 2 days NordStream2
  • 2 days CO2 Electrolysis to CO (Carbon Monoxide) and then to Graphite
  • 3 days Big Bounce: Russian gas amid market tightness - new report by Oxford Institute for Energy Studies
SciDev SciDev

SciDev SciDev

SciDev.Net – the Science and Development Network – is a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to providing reliable and authoritative information about science and technology for the…

More Info

Premium Content

How the Nuclear Renaissance Could Benefit Developing Countries

The world is on the brink of a nuclear power renaissance, and developing countries may also benefit, according to researchers.

In a study published in Science, British researchers outlined a vision for flexible and more user-friendly nuclear technologies, as worries over climate change, energy supply security, and depletion of fossil fuels, are overturning decades of hesitancy over the safety of nuclear power plants.

Robin Grimes, materials researcher at Imperial College London and William Nuttall, senior lecturer in technology policy at the University of Cambridge, believe nuclear power will become viable for energy production in developing countries post-2030. "Outside currently established nuclear countries, flexible nuclear technologies will be especially attractive, reducing the need for grid infrastructure," Grimes told SciDev.Net.

The authors envisage ship-borne power plants providing energy to big cities, requiring less grid infrastructure and making it easier to invest in cost-effective nuclear energy from scratch.

Grimes also suggested 'fuelled-for-life core reactors' — fully sealed modular reactors that could last 40 years and remove fuel handling from the energy production process. These would also reduce workers' exposure to radiation, reducing the need for expensive monitoring.

Another idea is to develop reactors with replaceable parts to extend their 40–50 year life span, so that investment in reactors was more cost effective.

Technologies now under development could mean 'fast reactors' using uranium 15 times more efficiently than at present. They could become available by 2030, reducing the cost of raw materials.

But any country, developing or not, must show both an "economic need for nuclear energy" and "a clearly independent nuclear regulatory body that has access to the necessary facilities and the people to carry out its work," Grimes told SciDev.Net.

Safety and nuclear proliferation criteria as laid down by the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty would need to be met, as well as compliance with the International Atomic Energy Agency, standards.

If these criteria are met, reducing reliance on grid infrastructure is a key point for developing countries wishing to join the predicted renaissance, as it keeps costs low, Grimes said.

But some experts are doubtful. Referring to solar energy, John Finney, chair of the British Pugwash Group but speaking in a personal capacity, said that other options such as solar power might also suit developing countries.

Bob van der Zwaan, senior scientist at the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands said that nuclear energy was not a silver bullet, but could address climate change, pollution, and energy dependency problems "along with other options such as renewable".

By. Colin Stuart

Source: SciDev


Download The Free Oilprice App Today

Back to homepage





Leave a comment
  • Anonymous on November 29 2010 said:
    The stated requirements are extremely important:"But any country, developing or not, must show both an "economic need for nuclear energy" and "a clearly independent nuclear regulatory body that has access to the necessary facilities and the people to carry out its work," Grimes told SciDev.Net.Safety and nuclear proliferation criteria as laid down by the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty would need to be met, as well as compliance with the International Atomic Energy Agency, standards."Something crucial is being left out, however. Many countries in the third world lack the human capital to field a competent team of nuclear workers. Maintaining a conventional power grid is apparently too difficult for large parts of the third world.How much harder will it be to maintain an advanced technology nuclear plant?The basics of human capital are an unavoidable obstacle to development that the politcally correct simply cannot see.

Leave a comment




EXXON Mobil -0.35
Open57.81 Trading Vol.6.96M Previous Vol.241.7B
BUY 57.15
Sell 57.00
Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News