• 1 day PDVSA Booted From Caribbean Terminal Over Unpaid Bills
  • 1 day Russia Warns Ukraine Against Recovering Oil Off The Coast Of Crimea
  • 1 day Syrian Rebels Relinquish Control Of Major Gas Field
  • 1 day Schlumberger Warns Of Moderating Investment In North America
  • 1 day Oil Prices Set For Weekly Loss As Profit Taking Trumps Mideast Tensions
  • 1 day Energy Regulators Look To Guard Grid From Cyberattacks
  • 1 day Mexico Says OPEC Has Not Approached It For Deal Extension
  • 1 day New Video Game Targets Oil Infrastructure
  • 2 days Shell Restarts Bonny Light Exports
  • 2 days Russia’s Rosneft To Take Majority In Kurdish Oil Pipeline
  • 2 days Iraq Struggles To Replace Damaged Kirkuk Equipment As Output Falls
  • 2 days British Utility Companies Brace For Major Reforms
  • 2 days Montenegro A ‘Sweet Spot’ Of Untapped Oil, Gas In The Adriatic
  • 2 days Rosneft CEO: Rising U.S. Shale A Downside Risk To Oil Prices
  • 2 days Brazil Could Invite More Bids For Unsold Pre-Salt Oil Blocks
  • 2 days OPEC/Non-OPEC Seek Consensus On Deal Before Nov Summit
  • 2 days London Stock Exchange Boss Defends Push To Win Aramco IPO
  • 2 days Rosneft Signs $400M Deal With Kurdistan
  • 3 days Kinder Morgan Warns About Trans Mountain Delays
  • 3 days India, China, U.S., Complain Of Venezuelan Crude Oil Quality Issues
  • 3 days Kurdish Kirkuk-Ceyhan Crude Oil Flows Plunge To 225,000 Bpd
  • 3 days Russia, Saudis Team Up To Boost Fracking Tech
  • 3 days Conflicting News Spurs Doubt On Aramco IPO
  • 4 days Exxon Starts Production At New Refinery In Texas
  • 4 days Iraq Asks BP To Redevelop Kirkuk Oil Fields
  • 4 days Oil Prices Rise After U.S. API Reports Strong Crude Inventory Draw
  • 4 days Oil Gains Spur Growth In Canada’s Oil Cities
  • 4 days China To Take 5% Of Rosneft’s Output In New Deal
  • 4 days UAE Oil Giant Seeks Partnership For Possible IPO
  • 4 days Planting Trees Could Cut Emissions As Much As Quitting Oil
  • 4 days VW Fails To Secure Critical Commodity For EVs
  • 5 days Enbridge Pipeline Expansion Finally Approved
  • 5 days Iraqi Forces Seize Control Of North Oil Co Fields In Kirkuk
  • 5 days OPEC Oil Deal Compliance Falls To 86%
  • 5 days U.S. Oil Production To Increase in November As Rig Count Falls
  • 5 days Gazprom Neft Unhappy With OPEC-Russia Production Cut Deal
  • 5 days Disputed Venezuelan Vote Could Lead To More Sanctions, Clashes
  • 5 days EU Urges U.S. Congress To Protect Iran Nuclear Deal
  • 6 days Oil Rig Explosion In Louisiana Leaves 7 Injured, 1 Still Missing
  • 6 days Aramco Says No Plans To Shelve IPO
EcoSeed

EcoSeed

Ecoseed’s mission is to provide global, complete, innovative, and up to date news, information, resources, and opportunities, catalyst to incorporate environmental awareness and responsibility into…

More Info

Researchers Develop a More Efficient Approach to Extracting Geothermal Energy

Researchers Develop a More Efficient Approach to Extracting Geothermal Energy

Researchers from the University of Minnesota’s Department of Earth Sciences have developed an approach to extracting geothermal energy more efficiently while reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide at the same time.

The new approach, which the researchers call carbon dioxide-plume geothermal system or C.P.G., uses high-pressure carbon dioxide to produce power from the Earth’s heat.

In conventional geothermal power technology, water is used to tap into the Earth’s heat. Hot water or steam is extracted from underground rock formations then used to turn turbines to produce power.

The C.P.G. system also used the Earth’s heat but instead of water, uses high pressure carbon dioxide as the underground heat-carrying fluid.

“This is probably viable in areas you couldn’t even think about doing regular geothermal for electricity production. In areas where you could, it’s perhaps twice as efficient,” said Jimmy Randolph, a graduate student and co-developer of the technology.

Another benefit of using pure carbon dioxide as the heat-carrying fluid is that it reduces the risk of blockage in the flow of fluid in a geothermal system because it does not dissolve the material around it like hot water does.

In addition to harnessing geothermal energy more efficiently, C.P.G. can sequester carbon dioxide deep underground where it cannot contribute to climate change.

Mr. Randolph along with Earth sciences faculty member Martin Saar got the idea for C.P.G. when they were conducting research on geothermal energy capture and separately on geologic carbon dioxide sequestration.

They received a grant from the Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment, which they used for paying the preliminary computer modeling and to gather experts needed for the research. It also helped leverage a $1.5 million-grant from the United States Department of Energy to explore subsurface chemical interactions involved in the process.

Accessibility of geothermal energy has been a key issue in the United States where it generates only 4.68 percent of the total renewable energy output of the country.

Accessibility problems when it comes to geothermal are brought about by simple reasons such as the challenge of hard rocks on the surface which are tough to drill through and the fact that tapping into the energy source takes time.

With the researchers’ claims of extracting geothermal energy much more efficiently with the technology, this could help the country’s geothermal output. (L.J. Polintan)

Contributed by EcoSeed




Back to homepage


Leave a comment
  • Siraj on May 16 2012 said:
    Hydroelectric is bad. The dams necessary cause a LOT of eoanrnimentvl damage by disrupting the water flow and the habitat or many species. Look up the Colorado River and the Hoover Dam to learn about one of the more controlled issues. There have been many hydroelectric projects, especially in the former USSR that completely destroyed an entire regions ecological system and commerce because of the rerouting of water.I don't like solar because of the chemicals it takes to produce the photovoltaic cells. Other than that it is on its way to becoming quite efficient and versatile.I haven't done much research on geothermal, but I think it takes way too much work and disruption of the local environment to be the best option.I like wind the best. I know that some people are worried about wind farms disrupting the flight patterns of migratory birds, and killing birds as well. Therefor, I think it is a great idea to build these farms out at sea, where there is far less bird traffic.So, I think we should primarily use wind power, with solar power being a supplemental option, especially for remote locations, as you can (or will be able to, soon) produce a lot of power on site with a single panel. There is also a lot of interesting research going on with solar power. Scientists are working on a photovoltaic film that could be adhered to car windows and could aid or take the place of a car battery.

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News