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Train Collision In Florida Causes 4,000-Gallon Fuel Leak

Derail

A non-hazardous phosphate-loaded train collided head-on with a train loaded with coal in Marion County, Florida, early on Wednesday, causing a fuel leak of 4,000 gallons.

The two CSX trains derailed and 20 cars overturned in Citra, but no injuries have been reported, the Marion County Sheriff's Office said on its Facebook page.

CNN said that there are reports of two minor injuries.

The cause of the collision was not immediately known and is currently under investigation.

CSX is also trying to ascertain if the locomotives had released fuel and has sent environmental crews to contain a possible spill, CNN says.

A few weeks ago, two CSX trains collided in Chester Township, in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Then, a CSX freight train with three locomotives and 64 empty freight cars collided with another CSX train with one locomotive and eight intermodal cars carrying consumer goods and food products. In that collision two CSX employees were treated in hospital for injuries and the company said no hazardous materials were involved in the incident.

Back in June of this year, in the Pacific Northwest, Oregon transportation officials were calling for a halt of Union Pacific trains after a derailment earlier that month. Eleven cars from a 96-car train owned by Union Pacific that was hauling crude oil along the border of Oregon and Washington derailed, causing one of the cars to catch fire.

The Oregon Department of Transportation raised its concerns to the Oregon Transportation Commission, in reference to this specific type of train—crude-oil-only—which is heavier than others and might be putting greater strain on the lag bolts that connect the rails and tracks.

A month later, the U.S. Department of Transportation proposed a new set of rules for train cars carrying crude oil, following the Oregon incident.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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