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Ten Of The Worst Gas Guzzlers Money Can Buy

Ten Of The Worst Gas Guzzlers Money Can Buy

As gasoline prices tumbled throughout much of 2014, America’s auto dealerships noticed a distinct uptick in business. More like robust. Aggressive. By September, it wasn’t SUV’s, sports cars or hybrids leaving the lot the fastest. It was the Ford F-150, Chevy Silverado and Dodge Ram, in that order. As February’s auto sales figures revealed consumers are still abandoning sedans for less fuel efficient SUVs, pickups and crossovers. With gas prices low, buyers are obviously comfortable choosing vehicles they want over those they feel they ought to buy.

With that in mind, here are some of the 10 worst fuel-efficient vehicles, taken from the combined sources of Motortrend, Autoweek and the U.S. Department of Energy. Of note, and not showcased here, ultra high-end cars like the Rolls Royce Phantom EWB, Bentley Mulsanne, Aston Martin DB9 and the Mercedes Bens G63 AMG are not stingy on gas.

And if you have the new car bug, keep in mind the Gas Guzzler tax – charged to the manufactures and then likely passed on to the consumer – exempts all vehicles over 22.5 combined miles per gallon, but can tack on as much as a hefty $7,700 for vehicles at less than 12.5 MPG, with scaled penalties for all ranges in-between. However, not all vehicles are subject to the tax. There’s a formula the government uses, so it’s not a pure black-and-white scale. Nonetheless Gas Guzzler tax rates, if applicable, are listed for each guzzler on the list. Related: Consumers Winning With Low Oil Prices, For Now

#10 – 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT8 – 13 City/19 Highway / 15 Combined / No Gas Guzzler Tax

The STRT8 adds 5 mpg over the base model due to its 6.4 L eight-cylinder engine.


#9 – 2015 Toyota Sequoya – 13 City / 17 Highway / 15 Combined / No Gas Guzzler Tax

Although not as popular as it once was, the Sequoya offers a technically advanced 5.7 L V-8 6-speed automatic.

#8 – Cadillac CTS-V Sedan – 12 City / 18 Highway / 14 Combined / $1,300 Guzzler Tax
Sporting a whopping 556 hp motor, this is one of the most powerful, and inefficient, sedans on the market.


#7 – Lexus LX 570 – 12 City / 17 Highway / 14 Combined / No Gas Guzzler Tax
5.7 L V-8 at 383 horsepower, this SUV offers extreme comfort, fast acceleration and excellent off-road capability.

#6 – Nissan Armada – 12 City / 18 Highway / No Gas Guzzler Tax
5.6 L V-8 4-wheel drive. Towing capacity of 9,000 lbs. One of the older-style chassis and engine designs of the modern day SUV lineup.

#5 – Chevy Camaro ZL1 – 12 City / 18 Highway / 14 Combined / $2,600 Gas Guzzler Tax
6.2 L 8 Cylinder is not as efficient as competitors like the Ford Mustang or Dodge Challenger.

#4 – Chevrolet Express 2500 – 10 City / 15 Highway / 12 Combined / No Gas Guzzler Tax
6.0 8 Cylinder 6-speed automatic large van. EPA says this engine could cost you an extra $10,000 in fuel cost over five years compared to an average vehicle. Bigger may not always be better. Related: How Much Crude Oil Do You Consume On A Daily Basis?

#3 – Ford Raptor – 11 City / 16 Highway / 13 Combined / No Gas Guzzler Tax
6.2 L V-8 at 411 hp, with an optional 36 gallon tank that can be painful if gas is over $3.00.


#2 – Lamborghini Aventador – 10 City / 16 Highway / 12 Combined / $3,700 Gas Guzzler Tax

6.5 L V-12 with massive 700 hp output at over 8,000 rpm. If you can afford the $400,000+ price tag, neither the Gas Guzzler tax nor the fuel cost should be a problem.

#1 – Bugatti Veyron – 8 City / 15 Highway / 10 Combined / $6,400 Gas Guzzler Tax

Quad turbocharged 8 L 1200 hp rocket on wheels that tops out at 253 mph and zero to 60 in 2.4 seconds. By the way, if you’re budgeting for this beauty, at $2.4 million, you also need to be ready to replace the Michelin Super Sport tires every 10,000 miles at $42,000 a set, and every three replacements (30,000 miles) you’ll need to swap out the custom wheels to insure a proper seal at another $69,000 every 30K.

But, who’s counting?


By Thomas Miller for Oilprice.com

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