• 4 minutes China goes against US natural gas
  • 12 minutes WTI @ 67.50, charts show $62.50 next
  • 15 minutes Saudi Fund Wants to Take Tesla Private?
  • 1 hour Downloadable 3D Printed Gun Designs, Yay or Nay?
  • 18 mins Peak Oil is Now!
  • 12 hours Rattling With Weapons: Iran Must Develop Military To Guard Against Other Powers
  • 41 mins Russians hacking vs U.S., Microsoft President: Russians Targeting All Political Sides
  • 56 mins Corporations Are Buying More Renewables Than Ever
  • 7 hours VW Receives Massive Order Of 1,600 All-Electric Trucks
  • 15 hours Desperate Call or... Erdogan Says Turkey Will Boycott U.S. Electronics
  • 19 hours CO2 Emissions Hit 67-Year Low In USA, As Rest-Of-World Rises
  • 22 hours The EU Loses The Principles On Which It Was Built
  • 12 hours Batteries Could Be a Small Dotcom-Style Bubble
  • 22 hours Film on Venezuela's staggering collapse
  • 21 hours Saudi PIF In Talks To Invest In Tesla Rival Lucid
  • 18 hours Permian already crested the productivity bell curve - downward now to Tier 2 geological locations
Alt Text

Did This Startup Solve The Carbon Capture Challenge?

Costs have long prohibited carbon…

Alt Text

An Unexpected Carbon Tax Proposal

Dyed-in-the-wool, rock-ribbed Republicans have proposed…

Alt Text

Europe’s Toxic Radiation Cloud Remains A Mystery

Last month’s mysterious radiation cloud…

Futurity

Futurity

Futurity covers research news from the top universities in the US, UK, Canada and Australia

More Info

Trending Discussions

Politics Still Rules the Climate Change Debate in the US

US residents who believe in the scientific consensus on global warming are more likely to support government action to curb emissions, regardless of political party. But, there’s still a divide.

A political split remains on the existence of climate change despite the fact that the vast majority of scientists believe it is real, says Aaron M. McCright, associate professor in Lyman Briggs College and the Department of Sociology at Michigan State University.

The study, in the journal Climatic Change, is one of the first to examine the influence of political orientation on perceived scientific agreement and support for government action to reduce emissions.

Related article: Climate Change Debate Heats Up, Threatens Shale Boom

“The more people believe scientists agree about climate change, the more willing they are to support government action, even when their party affiliation is taken into account,” McCright says. “But there is still a political split on levels of perceived scientific agreement, in that fewer Republicans and conservatives than Democrats and liberals believe there is a scientific consensus.”

McCright and colleagues analyzed a Gallup survey of 1,024 adults who were asked about their views on climate change.

The results reaffirm the success of what McCright calls the “denial machine”—an organized movement to undercut the scientific reality of climate change during the past two decades.

McCright says the first step in dealing with climate change is getting both sides of the political spectrum to accept the scientific consensus. At that point, he says, policymakers can go about the task of coming up with an approach to combat it.

Related article: The Beijing Syndrome: China Begins to Care for the Environment

He says both government and industry should be involved in that effort.

“Certainly we can’t solve all our problems with global warming through government regulations—in fact, for some problems, government regulations might make it worse,” McCright says. “And so we need a combination of market-based solutions and government regulations.”

By. Andy Henion




Back to homepage

Trending Discussions


Leave a comment

Leave a comment




Oilprice - The No. 1 Source for Oil & Energy News